NEWS: Mapping

NEWS via Mashable: Mapmakers Debate How to Define Crimea

March 21, 2014 // 0 Comments

Mapmakers Debate How to Define Crimea A cartographer at work, circa 1930. IMAGE: VINTAGE IMAGES/HULTON ARCHIVE/GETTY IMAGES BY COLIN DAILEDA1 DAY AGO Much of the world is watching how the high-stakes tug-of-war over Crimea will play out, but few groups of professionals are more invested than cartographers. Cartographers are tasked with mapping the political dimensions of the globe. That means when a piece of land switches ownership between countries, it’s their job to decide whether they want to make that change official. The latest debate for this small but influential club is centered on Crimea, the once-autonomous region of Ukraine that voted on March 16 to become a part of Russia. Russian President Vladimir Putin has signed a treaty to annex the peninsula, and it now must be approved by the Russian parliament. On Wednesday, the Ukrainian governmentannounced it was pulling out its troops. But Western nations including the United States, the U.K., and Germany, have not [...]

NEWS via Quartz.com: Here’s what the future of car navigation looks like

March 20, 2014 // 0 Comments

Here’s what the future of car navigation looks like By Leo Mirani @lmirani March 12, 2014 In 1946, Jorge Luis Borges wrote “On Exactitude in Science,” a very short story about an empire so obsessed with cartography that it eventually built a map as vast as the territory “which coincided point for point with it.” That vision is now coming close to being reality. “Bona fide automotive AR [augmented reality] application is near a tipping point,”write three researchers from Virginia Tech in the February issue of ”Proceedings of the IEEE,” a peer-reviewed journal from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Among the most interesting developments they list is the use of head-up displays, or the projection of information in your field of vision, for in-car navigation. It is vision that dispenses with GPS devices and smartphone apps in favor of seeing the map overlaid on the real word in front of you. And it’s coming soon: “The infrastructure needed [...]

NEWS via FCW.com: Why Maps Matter

March 20, 2014 // 0 Comments

Why maps matter By Frank Konkel Mar 17, 2014 People used to use maps so they wouldn’t get lost. But in recent years, access to the Global Positioning System and the proliferation of mobile technology have made paper-based maps almost irrelevant. Unless you’re in uncharted territory, it’s hard to get lost anymore. Basic geography is as easy as inputting an address and letting your mobile phone tell you how to get there. And as mapping technology advances, it allows for far more than foolproof directions. Federal agencies now use geospatial data, geo-analytics and multi-layered maps for myriad purposes, including gathering intelligence, predicting disease outbreaks and sharing data pools with the public. The allure of mapping lies in its intuitiveness. Even simple “dots on a map can be a powerful way to see trends in data,” said Josh Campbell, geographic information system architect for the Humanitarian Information Unit at the State Department. “Maps [...]

NEWS via NPR: An Imaginary Town Becomes Real, Then Not. True Story

March 18, 2014 // 0 Comments

by ROBERT KRULWICH March 18, 2014 4:43 PM This is the story of a totally made-up place that suddenly became real — and then, strangely, undid itself and became a fantasy again. Imagine Pinocchio becoming a real boy and then going back to being a puppet. That’s what happened here — but this is a true story. It’s about a place in upstate New York called Agloe. You can see it here, circled in blue …  … just up the road from Roscoe and Rockland. In the 1930s (I learned from Frank Jacobs’ excellent blog, Strange Maps), there was no town on that stretch between Rockland and nearby Beaverkill — just a dirt road. This wasn’t an important or often visited place, which made it a perfect spot for what’s called a “paper town,” or a map “trap.” Pirate-Protected Maps Companies that create maps get their work copied all the time. You hire a draftsman. You check spellings, you work on the colors, you get all the cities in the [...]

NEWS via NOLA: Putting hip on the map: Real estate markets heat up when a neighborhood turns cool

March 17, 2014 // 0 Comments

Putting hip on the map: Real estate markets heat up when a neighborhood turns cool By Richard Campanella on March 12, 2014 at 9:00 AM, updated March 12, 2014 at 8:25 PM “Location, location, location,” the real estate adage goes. In fact, a number of complex variables drive the value of land, particularly for residential areas. They range from schools and quality of life, to amenities and safety, to prejudices, perceptions and social status. In recent decades, a new variant of social status has entered the real estate equation, and it has since transfigured downtown New Orleans and other American cities. It’s the curious cultural phenomenon known as cool. Neighborhoods that a decade or two ago were viewed as dirty, dangerous and disregarded now rank among the region’s hottest real estate markets, turned around courtesy of an emerging social charisma that may be described as “hip” or “cool.” Among them are Bywater and adjacent areas down [...]

NEWS via Newsweek: The Geography of Autism

March 15, 2014 // 0 Comments

The Geography of Autism By Rob Verger Filed: 3/14/14 at 2:56 PM  | Updated: 3/14/14 at 4:09 PM A new study hints at why autism clusters, but experts caution seeking an easy solutionEnrique De La Osa/Reuters Filed Under: Tech & Science, autism, Science, Studie Researchers have long know that autism is found in clusters. Certain communities and states have rates much higher than the rest of the country — a child born in California is several times more likely to be diagnosed with autism than a child in Alabama, for example. But the question why remains unanswered. The geographical nature of the disorder seems to imply some sort of local, environmental cause. And a new study suggests just that: it found a strong correlation between autism rates and male reproductive system malformations, which can be caused by environmental toxins. There is a complex array of factors that can influence autism rates, though: they seem to be affected by issues as diverse as income level, [...]

NEWS via Telegraph: The maps which explain the Ukraine crisis

March 7, 2014 // 0 Comments

The maps which explain the Ukraine crisis As Russia and Ukraine come ever closer to blows over Crimea, we explain, using maps, the issues at stake 10:35AM GMT 04 Mar 2014 Ukranian and Russian Military Balance Ukraine’s regular army has only 65,000 soldiers, compared with almost 300,000 deployed in Russia’s western and southern military districts, which border Ukraine. Russia also has an established military presence inside the Ukrainian region of Crimea, centred around the Black Sea Fleet base at the port of Sevastopol. These forces have now fanned out across Crimea and seized de facto control of the territory. EU gas dependency The three pipelines that carry gas across Ukraine to Poland and Slovakia and on to the EU. Trade sanctions are unpopular among European countries, which are heavily dependent on Russian oil and gas. Europe gets 40 per cent of its natural gas from Russia. Germany is particularly reluctant to get into a sanctions war since it imports more than a [...]

NEWS via NBCNews: First Americans May Have Been Stuck in Beringia for Millennia

March 6, 2014 // 0 Comments

First Americans May Have Been Stuck in Beringia for Millennia BY ALAN BOYLE WILLIAM MANLEY / IAAR / UNIV. OF COLO. This map shows the outlines of modern Siberia (left) and Alaska (right) with dashed lines. The broader area in a darker shade of green, which is now covered by ocean, represents the Bering land bridge as it existed about 18,000 years ago. Anthropologists say that the ancestors of Native Americans started making their way from Siberia to the Americas 25,000 years ago over a land bridge that once spanned the Bering Sea — but there are gaps in that story: Why didn’t those migrants leave behind any archaeological traces until 10,000 years later? Now scientists are homing in on an explanation: During all those millennia, the first Americans were isolated on the land bridge itself. When the land bridge vanished, so did the evidence of that Beringian culture. The “Beringian Standstill” hypothesis was first proposed by Latin American geneticists in 1997, as a [...]

MAP via Sentencing Project: How Felon Voting Policies Restrict the Black vote

March 3, 2014 // 0 Comments

Cartogram of disenfranchisement rates, 2010. (Sentencing Project) In Florida, more than one in five black adults can’t vote. Not because they lack citizenship or haven’t registered, but because they have, at some point, been convicted of a felony. More than 20 percent of black adults have lost their right to vote in Florida, Kentucky and Virginia, according to the Sentencing Project, a group that advocates for reforms to sentencing policy that reduces racial [...]

NEWS via Time: This Map Shows Where in the U.S. You Have the Highest Chance of Getting Struck by Lightning

March 1, 2014 // 0 Comments

This Map Shows Where in the U.S. You Have the Highest Chance of Getting Struck by Lightning PSA of the day By Olivia B. Waxman @OBWaxFeb. 28, 2014 Today, Atlantic Cities points out that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has published a map of lightning strikes in the U.S. According to the description of the map in the Google Maps Gallery, the map is organized by county and represents incidents over “the years 1995-2000 and 2001-2009.” The darker the shade of red, the more “events” have occurred, and the map breaks down each county’s data in terms of total number of injuries, fatalities, cost of property damage, and cost of crop damage. Read more: Lightning Map by USGS Shows Where You’re Most Likely to Get Struck | [...]

RESOURCE via GoogleMapsMania: Google’s Population Explorer-TRY THIS!

February 28, 2014 // 0 Comments

Monday, February 24, 2014 Population Mapping Population Explorer is a Google Maps based tool that can estimate the population of any area on Earth, down to an area of 1km2. Draw a polygon anywhere on the Earth and Population Explorer will provide an estimate of the population within the defined area. I’ve tested the tool by selecting areas that I know, such as London and the UK, and I’ve also tested it by searching for estimates in deserts and the sea. From my limited testing Population Explorer does seem to return accurate population estimates. The results of each search displays the total population, the population density, the number of males & females, the age structure of the population and population growth [...]

Map via WashingtonPost: Where the Millionaires Are

February 27, 2014 // 0 Comments

Where the Millionaires Are Per capita millionaire households (Source: Phoenix Global Wealth Monitor) More than six million households in the United States have liquid assets worth more than $1 million, according to new estimates that show the greatest concentrations of wealth in the United States are along the Interstate 95 corridor. (Click through for an interactive [...]

MAP via WashingtonPost: Who’s most well off

February 26, 2014 // 0 Comments

Who’s most well off Gallup’s well-being index. Gallup’s well-being index relies on 55 metrics, including rates of obesity, produce consumption, smoking, depression and psychological fulfillment. Generally, the best-off states are in the Midwest and West while the worst are in the south. And there was quite a bit of a shakeup last year. Nineteenth-ranked North Dakota rose to the top spot, while 12th-ranked South Dakota took the second spot. After four years on top, Hawaii fell to the eighth spot. Read more at [...]

NEWS via Channel NewsAsia: Virginia to be first US state to include “East Sea” in textbooks

February 24, 2014 // 0 Comments

The US State of Virginia has recently voted to include the name “East Sea” in its history and geography textbooks, alongside what is now marked only as the “Sea of Japan”. File photo: A South Korean warship conducts in the Sea of Japan, also known as the East Sea in South Korea. (AFP/South Korean Navy) VIRGINIA: The US State of Virginia has recently voted to include the name “East Sea” in its history and geography textbooks, alongside what is now marked only as the “Sea of Japan”. The House of Delegates passed the bill in a vote of 81 to 15, and once it is signed into law, Virginia will be the first American state to include “East Sea”, South Korea’s name for the stretch of water. The move appears to show that Korean Americans have been mobilised by their country’s increasingly strained relationship with Tokyo. Peter Y Kim, a Korean American lawyer living in Annandale in Virginia, was shocked when he caught a glimpse of his son’s fifth grade [...]
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