NEWS: Population & Migration

NEWS via psMag: Ironic Gentrification and the Migration of Globalization

March 24, 2014 // 0 Comments

Ironic Gentrification and the Migration of Globalization BY JIM RUSSELL • March 20, 2014 • 2:00 AM Cherry blossom trees in Buffalo, New York, in bloom. (Photo DragonFire1024/Wikimedia Commons) Higher education and health care, two major elements of the new Legacy Economy, are attracting global talent and gentrifying the neighborhoods that surround them, pricing out residents who toil in the local or regional labor market. I link economic globalization to gentrification with migration. Gentrification itself is an indicator of intensifying globalization. The influx of migrants who toil in a global labor market move into a neighborhood and compete with residents who toil in a local or regional labor market. Soon enough, the rent is too damn high. Or, if you like (I do), the wages are too damn low. Both cost for shelter and income impact housing affordability. A conventional measure that captures both variables is percentage of income dedicated to housing. In that light, some [...]

NEWS via TheAtlanticCities.com: America’s 1,000 Richest Neighborhoods

March 23, 2014 // 0 Comments

America’s 1,000 Richest Neighborhoods RICHARD FLORIDA MAR 13, 2014 Carolyn Williams/Flickr America’s “one percent” are a privileged bunch. It takes an adjusted gross income of almost $400,000 to be counted among those who make up the country’s top earners. Together, the top 1 percent account for nearly 20 percent of reported taxable income in the U.S. Overall, the one percent are heavily concentrated along the East and West Coasts. And despite all the talk about gentrification and the movement of the uber-affluent back to the cities, their numbers are overwhelmingly concentrated in the upscale suburbs of America’s increasingly bicoastal economy – places like Greenwich, Connecticut; Bethesda and Potomac, Maryland; Coral Gables, Florida; and Newport Beach, California. Eighteen neighborhoods have average incomes of more than $500,000. These are the location patterns of America’s super rich that geographer Stephen Higley has documented in a new [...]

VIDEO via Frontline: India-The Missing Girls

March 21, 2014 // 0 Comments

Frontline Roughtcut Website In 2006, when my wife and I traveled to India to live and work, the one issue that kept grabbing our attention was northern India’s deep cultural preference for sons over daughters. The desire for sons can be so great, that some families, after having a girl or two, will abort female fetuses until they bear a son. The practice is called female feticide or sex selection. In some ways this is a very old tale. Long before medical abortion became available, unwanted girls were killed after birth or not given enough food and medicine to survive. But modern technology has changed that. Ultrasound machines, which make it possible to determine the gender of a fetus, have spread from big city hospitals to small country clinics. Portable machines are taken to remote villages by motorcycle. As a consequence, infanticide has given way to feticide. Despite a law banning sex selective abortion in force for a decade, as many as half a million female fetuses are [...]

NEWS via CNN: Plugging China’s talent pool

March 20, 2014 // 0 Comments

Plugging China’s talent pool By Zarina Banu for CNN March 20, 2014 — Updated 0603 GMT (1403 HKT) Many are leaving China for reasons like education, food and wealth security and air quality. STORY HIGHLIGHTS China sees 8.5 million mainly middle-class living abroad with less than 10% moving in Paper in China calls exodus “the world’s worst brain drain” Hong Kong (CNN) — “Culture is not the main reason why most Chinese people leave. This is a romantic view. Most people leave China because of practical reasons like education, food and wealth security and air quality.” This is the view of Li Chen, who moved to Hong Kong from the mainland two years ago. A combination of pragmatism and aspiration led the 32-year-old Masters of Journalism student to leave. He said when his wife was offered the chance to relocate to Hong Kong, the timing for the couple was just right. The move allowed Li to pursue his passion for photography and will earn him [...]

NEWS via SBS.com: Why geography is Australia’s biggest silent killer

March 16, 2014 // 0 Comments

Why geography is Australia’s biggest silent killer Understanding how the characteristics of a particular place impact health is critically important if we are to understand how to improve health and longevity in rural and remote Australia. By Lesley Barclay, University of Sydney Many people think the poorer health and lower life expectancy of people living in rural or remote Australia are attributable to the under-supply of health services in those areas. But this is only one contributing factor. Far more important is the distribution of health risk factors and how they interact with the nature of rural and remote places, which results in people dying younger. Data from the National Health Performance Authority shows life expectancy at birth ranges from 83.6 years in metro areas to 81.5 in regional hubs and 78.2 in rural places. The picture is even grimmer when we look at avoidable deaths. From a population of 100,000, there are 115 avoidable deaths in metro areas compared to [...]

NEWS via Christian Science Monitor: Why African-Americans are moving back to the South

March 16, 2014 // 0 Comments

After decades of moving north, thousands of blacks are returning to their Southern roots for economic and cultural reasons. By Carmen K. Sisson, Correspondent / March 16, 2014 Artist Kia Darceo left Milwaukee for Atlanta, which she calls ‘Black Mecca.’ This is the cover story in the Mar. 17 issue of The Christian Science MonitorWeekly. Melanie Stetson Freeman/Staff WEST POINT, MISS. When Charlie Cox told his friends he was leaving Chicago, no one tried to talk him out of it. After 35 years at General Motors, he was ready to retire. Ready to trade the cold and the crime and the frenetic pace of life for the rivers and fields of his youth. He had grown up in rural West Point, Miss., and he had moved north with his family when he was 9 years old, but somehow his heart had never quite followed. His spirit yearned for the South, and, as the years passed, the memories of his childhood burned brighter until he couldn’t stand it any longer. There was only one problem: [...]

NEWS via Guardian Liberty Voice: China Population Structure Change Demands Economic Reform

March 15, 2014 // 0 Comments

China Population Structure Change Demands Economic Reform Added by Tina Zhang on March 15, 2014. On March 13, China’s annual parliament meeting closed. Reforms in financialsector, economic structure, environmental protection, and many other areas were proposed. During the nine days of the meeting, there was plenty of news showing disappointing performance in areas such as investment, retail sales and factory output in the first two months of this year. These already invited speculations that policy easing from the government should be imminent. Beijing repeated said it would tolerate slower economic growth in exchange for economic structural transformation. Aside from the often-quoted reasons for such reform, the unstoppable change of the population structure demands China must tough through the pain of slowing economy and its structural reform. China’s working-age population shrank for the first time in 2012 by 3.45 million. Looking into the future, the number of 15 to 24 [...]

NEWS via StarTribune: In Africa, hopes that surging population will drive growth are overblown

March 15, 2014 // 2 Comments

How unusual is Africa’s demography? U.N. estimates of slowing birth rates predicted an economic surge, but trends have fallen short, as have manufacturing and private investment. If you refer to Algeria and Tunisia in the north and Botswana and South Africa in the south, you may answer: not that unusual. In the early 1960s those nations had fertility rates of between 5.5 and 7.5, about the same as rates in Brazil, China, Indonesia and Mexico at the time. Now, all of those countries’ fertility rates are between 1.5 and 3.0. The main difference is that the Asian and Latin American nations saw their fertility decline at a fairly steady pace over the past 50 years, whereas the African ones saw a sharp decline beginning in the mid-1980s. In a recent study, demographers Jean-Pierre Guengant and John May say the north and south of the continent are exceptions. Most of Africa is catching up too little, too late. The result is that the continent’s overall population will rise sharply, [...]

NEWS via TurkishPress: World’s population at risk from organism-borne diseases

March 14, 2014 // 0 Comments

World’s population at risk from organism-borne diseases Tuesday, March 11, 2014 GENEVA – The World Health Organization (WHO) has released information stating that more than half of the world`s population is at risk from vector-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue. Diseases such as these are commonly found in tropical and sub-tropical regions and places where access to safe drinking-water and sanitation systems is problematic. They are spread via vectors which are small organisms, such as mosquitoes, sandflies and ticks, which transmit pathogens and parasites from one infected person, or animal, to another causing serious disease in human populations. Vector-borne diseases account for an estimated 17 percent of the world`s infectious diseases with the most deadly being malaria, which caused an estimated 660,000 deaths in 2010, according to WHO. However, the world`s fastest growing vector-borne disease is dengue, with a 30-fold increase in cases of the disease over the [...]

News via India.com: As the world population increases, eating insects could soon become mainstream

March 11, 2014 // 0 Comments

As the world population increases, eating insects could soon become mainstream Agencies March 9, 2014 at 7:31 pm How would you react if your neighborhood restaurant serves you a menu that only lists cuisines prepared from caterpillars or termites? People would soon have no choice but to consume insects as it would be increasingly difficult to feed the burgeoning world population — close to 8 billion now — in near future, warned the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). A latest FAO report, titled ‘Edible Insects: Future Prospects for Food and Feed Security’, lists ‘entomophagy’ — a diet supplemented by insects that has health and environmental benefits. How can these insects satiate your palate in years to come? Mopane caterpillars is one such insect. It is traditionally boiled in salted water and dried in sun before eating. It can last for several months without refrigeration. According to FAO, these are a good source of potassium, sodium, [...]

NEWS via NewYorkTimes: Some Who Fled Cuba Are Returning to Help

March 7, 2014 // 2 Comments

Some Who Fled Cuba Are Returning to Help By DAMIEN CAVEMARCH 4, 2014 At Atelier, foreigners and Cubans find food and service that had disappeared from Havana for decades. Credit Todd Heisler/The New York Times HAVANA — The business ideas have ranged from a bikini franchise to a peanut farm, restaurants, and design firms for software and home interiors. But even more novel than the pitches — in a country where entrepreneurship used to be illegal — is the financial muscle behind them: Cuban-Americans whose families lost their previous ventures to Cuba’s Communist government. “It’s all about people not losing hope and seeing that starting a business is a way to improve their lives,” said Eduardo Mestre, 65, a Wall Street banker who returned to Cuba last year for the first time since 1960 to see the start-up training he helps finance. “Emotionally, it’s very hard not to connect with people who have all this ambition in a place where maintaining hope is very hard to [...]

NEWS via Telegraph: The maps which explain the Ukraine crisis

March 7, 2014 // 0 Comments

The maps which explain the Ukraine crisis As Russia and Ukraine come ever closer to blows over Crimea, we explain, using maps, the issues at stake 10:35AM GMT 04 Mar 2014 Ukranian and Russian Military Balance Ukraine’s regular army has only 65,000 soldiers, compared with almost 300,000 deployed in Russia’s western and southern military districts, which border Ukraine. Russia also has an established military presence inside the Ukrainian region of Crimea, centred around the Black Sea Fleet base at the port of Sevastopol. These forces have now fanned out across Crimea and seized de facto control of the territory. EU gas dependency The three pipelines that carry gas across Ukraine to Poland and Slovakia and on to the EU. Trade sanctions are unpopular among European countries, which are heavily dependent on Russian oil and gas. Europe gets 40 per cent of its natural gas from Russia. Germany is particularly reluctant to get into a sanctions war since it imports more than a [...]

NEWS via NBCNews: First Americans May Have Been Stuck in Beringia for Millennia

March 6, 2014 // 0 Comments

First Americans May Have Been Stuck in Beringia for Millennia BY ALAN BOYLE WILLIAM MANLEY / IAAR / UNIV. OF COLO. This map shows the outlines of modern Siberia (left) and Alaska (right) with dashed lines. The broader area in a darker shade of green, which is now covered by ocean, represents the Bering land bridge as it existed about 18,000 years ago. Anthropologists say that the ancestors of Native Americans started making their way from Siberia to the Americas 25,000 years ago over a land bridge that once spanned the Bering Sea — but there are gaps in that story: Why didn’t those migrants leave behind any archaeological traces until 10,000 years later? Now scientists are homing in on an explanation: During all those millennia, the first Americans were isolated on the land bridge itself. When the land bridge vanished, so did the evidence of that Beringian culture. The “Beringian Standstill” hypothesis was first proposed by Latin American geneticists in 1997, as a [...]

NEWS via HeritageDaily: 17th- and 18th-century risk of disease through Migration

March 5, 2014 // 0 Comments

17th- and 18th-century risk of disease through Migration HERITAGE March 3, 2014 – No comments The fate of migrants moving to cities in 17th- and 18th-century England demonstrates how a single pathogen could dramatically alter the risks associated with migration and migratory patterns today. Cities have always been a magnet to migrants. In 2010, a tipping point was reached for the first time when, according to the World Health Organization, the majority of the world’s population lived in cities. By 2050, seven out of 10 people will have been born in – or migrated to – a city. One hundred years ago, that figure was two out of 10. Today, cities are generally the safest places to live. If you live in one, you’re likely to be richer than someone living in a rural environment. If you’re richer, you’re likely to live longer. If you live in a city, you have better access to hospitals and healthcare, and you’re more likely to be immunised. But that was not always the [...]
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