NEWS: Urban Geography

NEWS via HeritageDaily: 17th- and 18th-century risk of disease through Migration

March 5, 2014 // 0 Comments

17th- and 18th-century risk of disease through Migration HERITAGE March 3, 2014 – No comments The fate of migrants moving to cities in 17th- and 18th-century England demonstrates how a single pathogen could dramatically alter the risks associated with migration and migratory patterns today. Cities have always been a magnet to migrants. In 2010, a tipping point was reached for the first time when, according to the World Health Organization, the majority of the world’s population lived in cities. By 2050, seven out of 10 people will have been born in – or migrated to – a city. One hundred years ago, that figure was two out of 10. Today, cities are generally the safest places to live. If you live in one, you’re likely to be richer than someone living in a rural environment. If you’re richer, you’re likely to live longer. If you live in a city, you have better access to hospitals and healthcare, and you’re more likely to be immunised. But that was not always the [...]

NEWS via Nat’l Geographic: The Growth of Megacities

February 19, 2014 // 0 Comments

Geography in the News: The Growth of Megacities Posted by Neal Lineback of Geography in the NewsTM on February 17, 2014 By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner,  Geography in the NewsTM Megacities’ Expansive Growth For the first time in human history, more of the world’s 6.8 billion people live in cities than in rural areas. That is an incredible demographic and geographic shift since 1950 when only 30 percent of the world’s 2.5 billion inhabitants lived in urban environments. The world’s largest cities, particularly in developing countries, are growing at phenomenal rates. As a growing landless class is attracted by urban opportunities, meager as they might be, these cities’ populations are ballooning to incredible numbers. A May 2010 Christian Science Monitor article on “megacities” predicted that by 2050, almost 70 percent of the world’s estimated 10 billion people—more than the number of people living today—will reside in urban areas. The social, [...]

NEWS via Times-Picayune: Shotgun geography: the history behind the famous New Orleans elongated house

February 14, 2014 // 0 Comments

Shotgun geography: the history behind the famous New Orleans elongated house Few elements of the New Orleans cityscape speak to the intersection of architecture, sociology and geography so well as the shotgun house. Once scorned, now cherished, shotguns shed light on patterns of cultural diffusion, class and residential settlement, social preferences and construction methods. Photo by Doug Parker/ The Times-Picayune archive NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune Few elements of the New Orleans cityscape speak to the intersection of architecture, sociology and geography so well as the shotgun house. Once scorned, now cherished, shotguns shed light on patterns of cultural diffusion, class and residential settlement, social preferences and construction methods.   The shotgun house is not an architectural style; rather, it is a structural typology — what folklorist John Michael Vlach described as “a philosophy of space, a culturally determined sense of dimension.” A [...]

NEWS via Business Insider Australia: These Maps Show Which Areas Of The Country Have The Biggest Carbon Footprints

February 14, 2014 // 0 Comments

These Maps Show Which Areas Of The Country Have The Biggest Carbon Footprints KELLY DICKERSON YESTERDAY AT 10:01 AM    19 It’s no secret that the U.S. is one of the biggest carbon emitters around. Households in the U.S. alone are responsible for 20% of greenhouse gas emissions, even though they account for just over 4% of the global population. But which areas in the U.S. are contributing the most? These interactive maps from the University of California, Berkeley show where the U.S. has the biggest carbon footprint. You can even calculate your city’s carbon footprint on their site. The carbon footprint measurement equals the total greenhouse gas emissions of the zip code in question. An area’s carbon footprint includes things like energy people use at home, energy used by businesses, and transportation. The biggest source of emissions depends on the area. For example, the suburbs have a higher percentage of emissions coming from individual vehicles than big cities do. [...]

RESOURCE via Metropolis Mag: These Maps Show How Subway Maps Twist Urban Reality

February 8, 2014 // 0 Comments

These Maps Show How Subway Maps Twist Urban Reality Komal Sharma A new project by historian Benjamin M. Schmidt reveals how wrong subway maps really are. Courtesy Benjamin M. Schmidt It’s not a secret that our subway maps distort the geographies of the metropoles they claim to represent. When we traverse a city everyday with an MTA (Metropolitan Transportation Authority NY) or WMATA map (Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority), our conception of the city—its boundaries, expanses—easily becomes scrambled. For instance, both Washington’s dense inner core and its spread-out outskirts are all shown on the same scale. In a grid city like Manhattan there might be some semblance of similarity, but in most other cities, reality on the ground is completely different. A new project developed at Northeastern University tackles these problems head on. Benjamin M. Schmidt, a professor of history, has designed interactive digital maps of Boston, New York and Washington that [...]

NEWS via Mlive.com: ‘I used to live here’: Saginaw’s Steep Population Drop hits Neighborhoods

February 2, 2014 // 0 Comments

Keyterms: Population Geography, urbanization, deindustrialization, out-migration, white-flight, redlining, push factors, Urban Geography, Economic Geography, Development, Blight, Industry, Manufacturing, secondary economic activity. (¯`·._.·(¯`·._.·(¯`·._.· Article Below ·._.·´¯)·._.·´¯)·._.·´¯) ‘I used to live here’: Saginaw’s steep population drop hits neighborhoods By Mark Tower | mtower@mlive.com on January 26, 2014 at 7:00 AM, updated January 26, 2014 at 11:17 AM SAGINAW, MI — Former Saginaw City Manager Darnell Earley often said his job was one of “managing decline.” In just five decades, the city’s population dropped from nearly 100,000 in the 1960s to fewer than 52,000 by the 2010 census. To say it another way, Saginaw lost 48 percent of its residents during the last 50 years. The reasons for the decline are many, and the impact of the outbound migration is still felt today. This week, The Saginaw News takes a look [...]

NEWS via CNN: ‘Hidden income’ makes China’s rich wealthier than thought

September 24, 2013 // 0 Comments

Hong Kong (CNN) — China’s urban rich are making far more than they officially report, suggesting the wealth gap in the world’s second largest economy is much higher than previously thought, according to a new study. The China Society of Economic Reform released a survey Monday that found “gray income” was 6.2 trillion yuan (U.S. $1 trillion), or 12% of GDP. “Gray income” can range from illegal cash from kickbacks to unreported income and gifts. “The result has highlighted expanding social inequalities and policy issues surrounding official corruption and income distribution,” said Wang Xiaolu, who led the research for the CSER, in an article in Caixin Online. “The richer the household, the more likely it receives shadow income.” The study comes a day after Bo Xilai, a once high-flying politician, was sentenced to life in prison for bribe-taking,15 years for embezzlement and seven years for abuse of power. Bo is [...]

NEWS: Everything is in China: The World’s Architecture Replicated in Chinese Copy Towns

September 14, 2013 // 0 Comments

Everything is in China: The World’s Architecture Replicated in Chinese Copy Towns. Via: Atlas Obscura Thames Town Chapel (photograph by Bianca Bosker/Original Copies)   The canals of Venice, the monuments of Paris, the skyscrapers of New York, even the pubs of London can all be found in China. The replicas are part of a trend of copycat architecture that has brought the architecture of the rest of the world, particularly of Europe and the United States, into the new developments of China’s growing cities. In a book released earlier this year called Original Copies: Architectural Mimicry in Contemporary China by Bianca Bosker, these cloned communities are examined both in their historical and cultural context. There’s Thames Town where a statue of Churchill looms before guards dressed in uniforms inspired by the Queen’s foot guard; New Amsterdam in Shenyang where a copy of the Hague’s Peace Palace is alongside a traditional ship; and New York, New [...]

NEWS: Urban Observatory comes to life at Esri International User Conference | SmartBlogs

July 11, 2013 // 0 Comments

Esri (GIS Mapping Software, Solutions, Service, Map Apps, and Data) just launched an interactive site that allows users to compare/contrast map data between 16 major cities (so far). Themes that can be compared include: Commercial/Industrial zones Roadspeed/Traffic/Airports Housing Density/ Population Density/Senior population/Youth population Public space Temperature Urban Footprint New development Urban Observatory comes to life at Esri International User Conference | SmartBlogs [...]
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