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NEWS via HeritageDaily: 17th- and 18th-century risk of disease through Migration

March 5, 2014 // 0 Comments

17th- and 18th-century risk of disease through Migration HERITAGE March 3, 2014 – No comments The fate of migrants moving to cities in 17th- and 18th-century England demonstrates how a single pathogen could dramatically alter the risks associated with migration and migratory patterns today. Cities have always been a magnet to migrants. In 2010, a tipping point was reached for the first time when, according to the World Health Organization, the majority of the world’s population lived in cities. By 2050, seven out of 10 people will have been born in – or migrated to – a city. One hundred years ago, that figure was two out of 10. Today, cities are generally the safest places to live. If you live in one, you’re likely to be richer than someone living in a rural environment. If you’re richer, you’re likely to live longer. If you live in a city, you have better access to hospitals and healthcare, and you’re more likely to be immunised. But that was not always the [...]

NEWS via PewResearch: Global Population Estimates by Age, 1950-2050-INTERACTIVE

February 26, 2014 // 0 Comments

JANUARY 30, 2014 Global Population Estimates by Age, 1950-2050 The demographic future for the U.S. and the world looks very different than the recent past. Growth from 1950 to 2010 was rapid—the global population nearly tripled, and the U.S. population doubled. However, population growth from 2010 to 2050 is projected to be significantly slower and is expected to tilt strongly to the oldest age groups, both globally and in the U.S. Source: United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, World Population Prospects: 2012 Revision, June [...]

NEWS via Al Jazeera: How the North Ended up on Top of the Map

February 23, 2014 // 0 Comments

How the north ended up on top of the map by Nick Danforth @ajam February 16, 2014 A cartographic history of what’s up McArthur’s Universal Corrective Map of the World.Flickr A world map drawn by the Moroccan cartographer Muhammad al-Idrisi for King Roger of Sicily, 1154. Wikipedia Why do maps always show the north as up? For those who don’t just take it for granted, the common answer is that Europeans made the maps and they wanted to be on top. But there’s really no good reason for the north to claim top-notch cartographic real estate over any other bearing, as an examination of old maps from different places and periods can confirm. The profound arbitrariness of our current cartographic conventions was made evident by McArthur’s Universal Corrective Map of the World, an iconic “upside down” view of the world that recently celebrated its 35th anniversary. Launched by Australian Stuart McArthur on Jan. 26, 1979 (Australia Day, naturally), this map is supposed to [...]

NEWS via APA: UN: There are 232 million international migrants worldwide

February 17, 2014 // 0 Comments

Years later, we still see evidence that Earnst Ravenstein’s Laws of Migration are still at work. -The Human Imprint ▇ ▅ █ ▅ ▇ ▂ ▃ ▁ ▁ ▅ ▃ ▅ ▅ ▄ ▅ ▇ Ravenstein’s Laws of Migration Most migrants move only a short distance. There is a process of absorption, whereby people immediately surrounding a rapidly growing town move into it and the gaps they leave are filled by migrants from more distant areas, and so on until the attractive force [pull factors] is spent. There is a process of dispersion, which is the inverse of absorption. Each migration flow produces a compensating counter-flow. Long-distance migrants go to one of the great centers of commerce and industry. Natives of towns are less migratory than those from rural areas. Females are more migratory than males over short distances; likewise males are more migratory than females over longer distances. Economic factors are the main cause of migration. ▇ ▅ █ ▅ ▇ ▂ ▃ ▁ ▁ [...]

NEWS via Reuters: U.N. Sounds Alarm on Worsening Global Income Disparities

February 9, 2014 // 0 Comments

U.N. sounds alarm on worsening global income disparities BY LOUIS CHARBONNEAU UNITED NATIONS Wed Jan 29, 2014 11:50am EST Helen Clark, head of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), speaks during a news conference after launching a report on ”Water Governance in the Arab Region” in Manama November 28, 2013 file photo. CREDIT: REUTERS/HAMAD I MOHAMMED (Reuters) – The U.N. Development Program warned in a report on Wednesday that income disparities in countries around the world have been worsening, posing new risks for global economic and political stability. The UNDP warning echoes remarks from U.S. President Barack Obama in his annual State of the Union address on Tuesday, in which he said there was a widening gap between rich and poor in the world’s biggest economy and that while the stock market has soared, average U.S. wages have barely budged. The UNDP report said income inequality increased by 11 percent in developing countries over the two [...]

NEWS via PRI.com: Will climate change Kill the Winter Olympics?

February 8, 2014 // 0 Comments

Will climate change kill the winter Olympics? Reporter Peter Thomson January 30, 2014 · 5:45 PM EST Credit: Wongm/Wikimedia commons- Snow making is underway at Mount Hotham in, Victoria, Australia, in 2007. The organizers of the games in Sochi, Russia, promise that there will be snow for the winter Olympics that start there next Friday. They’re hoping it’s mostly real snow, but they’ve also got hundreds of artificial snow makers at the ready, not to mention mountains of snow stored from last winter. But snow isn’t enough. You also need a venue that can handle an influx of tens of thousands of people, and a location where the facilities will still be useful after all those people disappear. That’s been a tough equation, even in the relatively stable climate since the first winter Olympics were held in 1924. But global warming will only make it worse. How much worse? A group of researchers led by Daniel Scott, a professor of Global Change and Tourism at [...]
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