NEWS: Agricultural Geography

NEWS via Christian Science Monitor: Drug trafficking in Central America Wreaking Havoc on Forests

February 7, 2014 // 0 Comments

  Drug trafficking in Central America wreaking havoc on forests, study finds Drug traffickers are targeting vast stretches of rainforest  for clandestine landing strips and roads to carry on the drug trade, study finds By Sudeshna Chowdhury, Staff writer / January 31, 2014 It is time to rethink the war on drugs from the perspective of “narco-deforestation,” say researchers, who have expressed concern over disappearing Central American rainforest . In a paper published in journal Science, researchers stated that in remote areas of Honduras, Guatemala,Nicaragua, and neighboring countries, drug traffickers are destroying forests, often protected areas, to make way for clandestine landing strips and roads to move drugs and money. Vast stretches of forest are also cleared to set up agribusinesses, primarily-cattle ranching, to launder drug money, Erik Nielsen, assistant professor in the School of Earth Sciences and Environmental Sustainability at Northern Arizona [...]

NEWS via NPR: The Katydid Dilemma: Will You Eat Insects?

January 17, 2014 // 0 Comments

Could this be the onset of the Fourth AGRICULTURAL REVOLUTION? One thing is for sure, it would have made ESTER BOSERUP smile. -Human Imprint ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Reblog via NPR The Katydid Dilemma: Will You Eat Insects? by BARBARA J. KING January 17, 201411:13 AM It’s right there on the dinner menu at Oyamel (a Washington, D.C., restaurant), listed under the “authentic Mexican tacos” section: Chapulines The legendary Oaxacan specialty of sauteed grasshoppers, shallots, tequila and guacamole. $5.00 Whether it’s sauteed grasshoppers at Oyamel or katydid grilled cheese sandwiches prepared for the annual Bug Fair at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles, insects are the new darlings of the avant-garde food world. At least that’s the message in the chapter called “Grub” from Dana Goodyear’s book Anything that Moves: Renegade Chefs, Fearless Eaters, and the Making of a New American Food Culture. Which animals we [...]

NEWS via: The real solution to South Africa’s food problem – Opinion – Al Jazeera English

September 12, 2013 // 0 Comments

As South Africa has grown more urban, so have poverty and hunger migrated to its cities. While the government of South Africa sees increasing penetration of supermarkets into poorer neighbourhoods as a way to encourage economic development and increase access to food, this strategy is inherently limited. In South Africa, urbanisation has contributed to a rapid increase in poverty and a rising population of urbanites who are undernourished. Sixty percent of South Africa’s population is now urbanised, and this figure is projected to reach 80 percent by 2050. In Cape Town, a 2011 survey found that over 80 percent of households were either moderately or severely food insecure in sampled low income neighbourhoods. In addition to overall caloric food insecurity, households were found to have limited dietary diversity. There is a deep rift in the international food policy community about the role of supermarkets in addressing urban hunger. One group sees “food deserts,” or [...]

NEWS via PRI: Low-Water Lunch: A Chinese Breakthrough on Irrigation?

July 11, 2013 // 0 Comments

Esther Boserup would be proud! It looks as though the Chinese have created a new irrigation system that allows plants to use water only as it needs-creating a more sustainable agricultural method to support it’s exploding population. Take that Malthus. Low-Water Lunch: A Chinese Breakthrough on Irrigation? | @pritheworld. Agronomist Kim Ji-Seok points to soil with trace irrigation that is moist, but not wet. (Photo: Mary Kay [...]

NEWS via PRI: Desert Lunch: Coaxing Climate-Friendly Food from the World’s Driest Places

June 20, 2013 // 0 Comments

Human Geography Topics: Thomas Malthus Ester Boserup Agriculture Commercial Gardening Horticulture Sustainable Agriculture —————————————————————— THOMAS MALTHUS would be shocked, ESTHER BOSERUP gleaning, “I told you so.” If you ever wondered what you could do with your degree in physics, agriculture, architecture, engineering, or environmental sciences, how about solving a food crisis in an area of the World that does not easily grow food.  For countries with growing populations and an environment that is not AGRICULTURE friendly, importing food is costly. So some scientists took on the challenge to build a test facility in Qatar. Why Qatar? One scientist says, “We started with a thought, and that was, let’s take what we have enough of, like seawater, like sunlight, like sand, like CO2, to produce what we need more of—food, water, [...]
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