America

INTERACTIVE via New York Times: Where Is America’s Heartland? Pick Your Map

January 5, 2017 // 0 Comments

Where is America’s Heartland? Pick your Map This short interactive has users choose a map that they feel best represents the “American Heartland.” After voting, they will see a tally and an article that discusses the topic of what the Heartland means to other people. Human Geography Application: This would be a good, 2 minute activity to direct students with 1:1 devices after discussing vernacular [...]

VIDEO via New York Times: A Conversation With Asians on Race

January 4, 2017 // 0 Comments

A Conversation with Asian-Americans on Race This video shows Asian Americans confronting stereotypes about their own community. Human Geography Application: This would be a great clip to show while discussion ethnicity. It would play very well with classrooms that have an Asian-American perspective, or to show students that there are stereotypes within other ethnic groups that might otherwise go [...]

RESOURCE: AP HuGe Recommended Texts

April 20, 2015 // 0 Comments

The following list is taken from the AP Human Geography Teacher’s Guide. The list looks a little dated, nevertheless, the authors have updated versions of their texts. ———————– Textbooks de Blij, H. J., and Alexander B. Murphy. Human Geography: Culture, Society, and Space. 7th ed. New York: John Wiley, 2003. Fellmann, Jerome D., Arthur Getis, and Judith Getis. Human Geography: Landscapes of Human Activities. 8th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2005. Jordan-Bychkov, Terry G., and Mona Domosh. The Human Mosaic: A Thematic Introduction to Cultural Geography. 9th ed. New York: W. H. Freeman, 2003. Knox, Paul L., and Sallie A. Marston. Places and Regions in Global Context: Human Geography. 3rd ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 2004. Kuby, Michael, John Harner, and Patricia Gober. Human Geography in Action. 3rd ed. New York: John Wiley, 2004. Norton, William. Human Geography. 5th ed. Don Mills, Ont.: Oxford University Press, 2004. [...]

AUDIO via NPR: In ‘1493’ Columbus Shaped a World To Be

October 13, 2014 // 0 Comments

This 37 minute story is great for kids in a 1:1 environment, or for a different homework assignment. The author Charles C. Mann discusses Christopher Columbus docking in the ‘New World’ and the ecological effects of bringing in invasive species to the Americas. This is a great transition from the Introduction unit to Agriculture (and also right around the time we are ‘celebrating’ Columbus Day at the mall. In 1493, Columbus Shaped a World To [...]

VIDEO via FreeBase: Charting Culture by Mapping Migration

August 14, 2014 // 0 Comments

Video: Thousands of Years of Human Migration in Five Minutes By Lisa Raffensperger | July 31, 2014 2:00 pm   It’s enough to put an old-fashioned family tree to shame. A visualization of the migration routes of more than 150,000 people, from 600 BC to the present day, brings to life human history in the Western world in an engrossing and novel way. The model, produced by Maximilian Schich, at the University of Texas at Dallas, along with collaborators from the U.S., Switzerland and Hungary, represents the birth and death dates and locations of individual people. These data came from community database Freebase, a well-known German encyclopedia of the world’s artists, and Getty’s online artist names database. The sample included such notable individuals as David, King of Israel, and Leonardo da Vinci, but, since Freebase is editable by anyone, it also included average folk. “You will have people where we know that there was a carpenter in Nuremberg, who lived from 1530 to [...]

NEWS via NPR: Map Of Native American Tribes You’ve Never Seen Before

June 26, 2014 // 0 Comments

http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2014/06/24/323665644/the-map-of-native-american-tribes-youve-never-seen-before The Map Of Native American Tribes You’ve Never Seen Before by HANSI LO WANG June 24, 2014 4:03 PM ET  Listen to the Story All Things Considered 3 min 36 sec Playlist Download Transcript Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has designed a map of Native American tribes showing their locations before first contact with Europeans. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR Finding an address on a map can be taken for granted in the age of GPS and smartphones. But centuries of forced relocation, disease and genocide have made it difficult to find where many Native American tribes once lived. Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has pinpointed the locations and original names of hundreds of American Indian nations before their first contact with Europeans. As a teenager, Carapella says he could never get his hands on a continental U.S. map like [...]

NEWS via NBCNews: With Migration, Indigenous Languages Going Extinct

March 25, 2014 // 0 Comments

With Migration, Indigenous Languages Going Extinct BY CARMEN SESÍN HOMESTEAD, FL – Her name is Spanish in origin, but for Juana Sales, a migrant farm-worker from the Guatemalan high lands, it hardly reflects her cultural identity. Ten years ago, when Sales arrived in Homestead, an agricultural area in South Florida, she only spoke Mam – a Mayan language that dates back to the year 500. The obscure tongue, which is mostly spoken in Guatemala and Mexico, is classified by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) as vulnerable to becoming extinct. Since then, Sales has learned a heavily accented, broken Spanish and a little English. She has 4 children who were born in the U.S., but none of them have shown interest in speaking their mother’s tongue. Salas is one of a growing number of U.S. Latinos who speak ancient Mesoamerican languages, some of which are considered critically endangered of becoming extinct. According to the 2010 [...]

NEWS via TheAtlanticCities.com: America’s 1,000 Richest Neighborhoods

March 23, 2014 // 0 Comments

America’s 1,000 Richest Neighborhoods RICHARD FLORIDA MAR 13, 2014 Carolyn Williams/Flickr America’s “one percent” are a privileged bunch. It takes an adjusted gross income of almost $400,000 to be counted among those who make up the country’s top earners. Together, the top 1 percent account for nearly 20 percent of reported taxable income in the U.S. Overall, the one percent are heavily concentrated along the East and West Coasts. And despite all the talk about gentrification and the movement of the uber-affluent back to the cities, their numbers are overwhelmingly concentrated in the upscale suburbs of America’s increasingly bicoastal economy – places like Greenwich, Connecticut; Bethesda and Potomac, Maryland; Coral Gables, Florida; and Newport Beach, California. Eighteen neighborhoods have average incomes of more than $500,000. These are the location patterns of America’s super rich that geographer Stephen Higley has documented in a new [...]

NEWS via BloombergBusinessWeek: Megadams Are Dismal Investments

March 22, 2014 // 0 Comments

Megadams Are Dismal Investments By Blake Schmidt March 13, 2014 Photograph by Taylor Weidman/Zuma Press Indigenous Munduruku men at the quarry site for Belo Monte It’s hard to overstate the massive proportions of Belo Monte. When completed, it will be the world’s third-largest dam. Set in the heart of the Brazilian Amazon, it will funnel water through 18 turbines, each with the diameter of the Space Shuttle. When the last one is switched on in 2019, Belo Monte will have a capacity of 11,233 megawatts—enough to supply power to 40 percent of Brazil’s households. Construction crews, which began work in 2011, will have to dig up almost twice as much dirt as was removed to build China’s Three Gorges Dam, and truck in enough steel to build 16 Eiffel Towers, according to the dam’s developers. About 26,000 laborers toil in shifts around the clock. Massive is a word that also applies to the hydropower project’s price. Norte Energia, the consortium awarded a 35-year concession [...]

NEWS via FCW.com: EPA: Using maps to make sense of water pollution data

March 21, 2014 // 0 Comments

EPA: Using maps to make sense of water pollution data By Frank Konkel Mar 17, 2014 West Virginians did not need an app to know that the Elk River had been contaminated when this Freedom Industries facility’s retaining wall failed, but there are tens of thousands of less famous waterways that the Environmental Protection Agency has identified as polluted. (AP Photo/Steve Helber) In early 2012, the Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Water began an effort to simplify how it conveys the complex information it has collected for decades. Nine months later, the agency launched a map-based application called “How’s My Waterway?” that allows users to check pollution levels in almost any U.S. lake, river or other waterway via the Web. The project’s launch coincided with the 40th anniversary of the Clean Water Act, which requires states to report data on waterways to the EPA. The agency in turn periodically updates Congress on the condition of the [...]

NEWS via Mashable: Mapmakers Debate How to Define Crimea

March 21, 2014 // 0 Comments

Mapmakers Debate How to Define Crimea A cartographer at work, circa 1930.IMAGE: VINTAGE IMAGES/HULTON ARCHIVE/GETTY IMAGES BY COLIN DAILEDA1 DAY AGO Much of the world is watching how the high-stakes tug-of-war over Crimea will play out, but few groups of professionals are more invested than cartographers. Cartographers are tasked with mapping the political dimensions of the globe. That means when a piece of land switches ownership between countries, it’s their job to decide whether they want to make that change official. The latest debate for this small but influential club is centered on Crimea, the once-autonomous region of Ukraine that voted on March 16 to become a part of Russia. Russian President Vladimir Putin has signed a treaty to annex the peninsula, and it now must be approved by the Russian parliament. On Wednesday, the Ukrainian governmentannounced it was pulling out its troops. But Western nations including the United States, the U.K., and Germany, have not [...]

NEWS via ABQjournal: Mexican economy’s growth in overdrive

March 19, 2014 // 0 Comments

Mexican economy’s growth in overdrive By Jerry Pacheco / For the Journal PUBLISHED: Monday, March 17, 2014 at 12:05 am The current economic situation in Mexico reminds me of what was going on in this country in the early 1990s. At that time, Mexico had fully committed to opening up its economy and opting for trade liberalization. It had a young president who was openly supportive of commerce and of foreign direct investment in his country. A wave of privatization, reversing the trends in the 1980s, was sweeping the country as it opened up its telecommunications and financial industries. The North American Free Trade Agreement was implemented in 1994 and Mexico was going full steam ahead to create a modern economy. Perhaps more than anything, there was a spirit of change and excitement in the air. Fast-forward 20 years and this same feeling seems to be in the air, as the Mexican economy grows and change is happening daily. Since taking office at the end of 2012, Mexican President [...]

NEWS via NPR: An Imaginary Town Becomes Real, Then Not. True Story

March 18, 2014 // 0 Comments

by ROBERT KRULWICH March 18, 2014 4:43 PM This is the story of a totally made-up place that suddenly became real — and then, strangely, undid itself and became a fantasy again. Imagine Pinocchio becoming a real boy and then going back to being a puppet. That’s what happened here — but this is a true story. It’s about a place in upstate New York called Agloe. You can see it here, circled in blue …  … just up the road from Roscoe and Rockland. In the 1930s (I learned from Frank Jacobs’ excellent blog, Strange Maps), there was no town on that stretch between Rockland and nearby Beaverkill — just a dirt road. This wasn’t an important or often visited place, which made it a perfect spot for what’s called a “paper town,” or a map “trap.” Pirate-Protected Maps Companies that create maps get their work copied all the time. You hire a draftsman. You check spellings, you work on the colors, you get all the cities in the [...]

NEWS via Christian Science Monitor: Why African-Americans are moving back to the South

March 16, 2014 // 0 Comments

After decades of moving north, thousands of blacks are returning to their Southern roots for economic and cultural reasons. By Carmen K. Sisson, Correspondent / March 16, 2014 Artist Kia Darceo left Milwaukee for Atlanta, which she calls ‘Black Mecca.’ This is the cover story in the Mar. 17 issue of The Christian Science MonitorWeekly. Melanie Stetson Freeman/Staff WEST POINT, MISS. When Charlie Cox told his friends he was leaving Chicago, no one tried to talk him out of it. After 35 years at General Motors, he was ready to retire. Ready to trade the cold and the crime and the frenetic pace of life for the rivers and fields of his youth. He had grown up in rural West Point, Miss., and he had moved north with his family when he was 9 years old, but somehow his heart had never quite followed. His spirit yearned for the South, and, as the years passed, the memories of his childhood burned brighter until he couldn’t stand it any longer. There was only one problem: [...]

INFOGRAPHIC: NPR-Planet Money: Every Job In America, In 1 Graph

January 10, 2014 // 0 Comments

National Public Radio posted a nice info graph that depicts employment numbers in each sector of the United States economy. This is a good opportunity to try to point out which sectors are PRIMARY, SECONDARY, TERTIARY, QUATERNARY, and QUINARY. The data is taken from the Bureau of Labor [...]
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