city

VIDEO via New York Times: A Conversation With Asians on Race

January 4, 2017 // 0 Comments

A Conversation with Asian-Americans on Race This video shows Asian Americans confronting stereotypes about their own community. Human Geography Application: This would be a great clip to show while discussion ethnicity. It would play very well with classrooms that have an Asian-American perspective, or to show students that there are stereotypes within other ethnic groups that might otherwise go [...]

Interactive via PBS: Can You Tell Someone’s Race by Looking at Them?

January 3, 2017 // 0 Comments

Race: The Power of Illusion Via PBS:  How easy is it to group people into “races” based on appearance? What about using individual traits? Does everybody classify the same way? Try your hand at “sorting” individuals and see if it matches how people think of themselves. Or explore how we might sort people by physical traits. Human Geography Application: After a lecture/discussion about the topic of race, ethnicity, and nationality, have your students complete this PBS interactive. It helps show them what they really don’t know about race based upon appearances. This could be a short 5-minute 1:1 activity on a device that supports flash, or it could stretch an entire block with interwoven discussion on race and [...]

MC Questions: Volume 1 Edition 4

December 28, 2016 // 0 Comments

MC questions this week are inspired by topics including the Chinese airpocalypse, Slovakian bathtub fish, chaupadi, the city of Orania, the winner of the Google Science Fair, and shadows cast by the buildings of New York City. As always, constructive criticism and discussion is welcome via WordPress, Facebook, or email. DOWNLOAD BELOW! [...]

VIDEO: Travel in La Paz Bolivia

April 25, 2016 // 0 Comments

This sure beats sitting in rush hour traffic. In La Paz, the sky rail take commuters where they need to go. This is the ultimate example of humans changing their environment out of necessity. Teachers: Use this to compare/contrast LDC vs MDC cities and what it means to have no city planning. Take the discussion further and ask students why this skirl can exist in a developing country but not in the [...]

VIDEO: Where are the World’s Worst Slums?

April 21, 2016 // 0 Comments

This short 2:46 second vide clip presented by TestTube News describes how the United Nations categorizes an urban slum and also where are the most populated urban slums in the world. It is a great introduction to problems within the LDC city and the topic of [...]

VIDEO via FreeBase: Charting Culture by Mapping Migration

August 14, 2014 // 0 Comments

Video: Thousands of Years of Human Migration in Five Minutes By Lisa Raffensperger | July 31, 2014 2:00 pm   It’s enough to put an old-fashioned family tree to shame. A visualization of the migration routes of more than 150,000 people, from 600 BC to the present day, brings to life human history in the Western world in an engrossing and novel way. The model, produced by Maximilian Schich, at the University of Texas at Dallas, along with collaborators from the U.S., Switzerland and Hungary, represents the birth and death dates and locations of individual people. These data came from community database Freebase, a well-known German encyclopedia of the world’s artists, and Getty’s online artist names database. The sample included such notable individuals as David, King of Israel, and Leonardo da Vinci, but, since Freebase is editable by anyone, it also included average folk. “You will have people where we know that there was a carpenter in Nuremberg, who lived from 1530 to [...]

Observations from the 2014 AP Human Geography Reading

June 11, 2014 // 4 Comments

Once again the AP Human Geography reading was a success. I still firmly believe that this group pf 500+ teachers and professors have GOT to be the most extraordinary and interesting people than any other group of readers. The stories that we all overhear while riding up the escalator for lunch are unbelievable and  inspires me to keep pushing to be a better teacher than I was yesterday. Never mind the 1125 free response questions that I graded- this is by far the best professional development that I can ever get. I am very thankful for a productive professional development night, and all of the other “professional development” nights outside of the convention center. After pondering the rubric that we used for grading and discussing it with my table, I decided to do some further research into the previous years and see what types of verbs that the FRQ test requests the students to answer. Some of my findings were interesting and provoked more thought while others were [...]

NEWS via psMag: Ironic Gentrification and the Migration of Globalization

March 24, 2014 // 0 Comments

Ironic Gentrification and the Migration of Globalization BY JIM RUSSELL • March 20, 2014 • 2:00 AM Cherry blossom trees in Buffalo, New York, in bloom. (Photo DragonFire1024/Wikimedia Commons) Higher education and health care, two major elements of the new Legacy Economy, are attracting global talent and gentrifying the neighborhoods that surround them, pricing out residents who toil in the local or regional labor market. I link economic globalization to gentrification with migration. Gentrification itself is an indicator of intensifying globalization. The influx of migrants who toil in a global labor market move into a neighborhood and compete with residents who toil in a local or regional labor market. Soon enough, the rent is too damn high. Or, if you like (I do), the wages are too damn low. Both cost for shelter and income impact housing affordability. A conventional measure that captures both variables is percentage of income dedicated to housing. In that light, some [...]

NEWS via TheAtlanticCities.com: America’s 1,000 Richest Neighborhoods

March 23, 2014 // 0 Comments

America’s 1,000 Richest Neighborhoods RICHARD FLORIDA MAR 13, 2014 Carolyn Williams/Flickr America’s “one percent” are a privileged bunch. It takes an adjusted gross income of almost $400,000 to be counted among those who make up the country’s top earners. Together, the top 1 percent account for nearly 20 percent of reported taxable income in the U.S. Overall, the one percent are heavily concentrated along the East and West Coasts. And despite all the talk about gentrification and the movement of the uber-affluent back to the cities, their numbers are overwhelmingly concentrated in the upscale suburbs of America’s increasingly bicoastal economy – places like Greenwich, Connecticut; Bethesda and Potomac, Maryland; Coral Gables, Florida; and Newport Beach, California. Eighteen neighborhoods have average incomes of more than $500,000. These are the location patterns of America’s super rich that geographer Stephen Higley has documented in a new [...]

NEWS via BloombergBusinessWeek: Megadams Are Dismal Investments

March 22, 2014 // 0 Comments

Megadams Are Dismal Investments By Blake Schmidt March 13, 2014 Photograph by Taylor Weidman/Zuma Press Indigenous Munduruku men at the quarry site for Belo Monte It’s hard to overstate the massive proportions of Belo Monte. When completed, it will be the world’s third-largest dam. Set in the heart of the Brazilian Amazon, it will funnel water through 18 turbines, each with the diameter of the Space Shuttle. When the last one is switched on in 2019, Belo Monte will have a capacity of 11,233 megawatts—enough to supply power to 40 percent of Brazil’s households. Construction crews, which began work in 2011, will have to dig up almost twice as much dirt as was removed to build China’s Three Gorges Dam, and truck in enough steel to build 16 Eiffel Towers, according to the dam’s developers. About 26,000 laborers toil in shifts around the clock. Massive is a word that also applies to the hydropower project’s price. Norte Energia, the consortium awarded a 35-year concession [...]

VIDEO via Frontline: India-The Missing Girls

March 21, 2014 // 0 Comments

Frontline Roughtcut Website In 2006, when my wife and I traveled to India to live and work, the one issue that kept grabbing our attention was northern India’s deep cultural preference for sons over daughters. The desire for sons can be so great, that some families, after having a girl or two, will abort female fetuses until they bear a son. The practice is called female feticide or sex selection. In some ways this is a very old tale. Long before medical abortion became available, unwanted girls were killed after birth or not given enough food and medicine to survive. But modern technology has changed that. Ultrasound machines, which make it possible to determine the gender of a fetus, have spread from big city hospitals to small country clinics. Portable machines are taken to remote villages by motorcycle. As a consequence, infanticide has given way to feticide. Despite a law banning sex selective abortion in force for a decade, as many as half a million female fetuses are [...]

NEWS via Mashable: Mapmakers Debate How to Define Crimea

March 21, 2014 // 0 Comments

Mapmakers Debate How to Define Crimea A cartographer at work, circa 1930.IMAGE: VINTAGE IMAGES/HULTON ARCHIVE/GETTY IMAGES BY COLIN DAILEDA1 DAY AGO Much of the world is watching how the high-stakes tug-of-war over Crimea will play out, but few groups of professionals are more invested than cartographers. Cartographers are tasked with mapping the political dimensions of the globe. That means when a piece of land switches ownership between countries, it’s their job to decide whether they want to make that change official. The latest debate for this small but influential club is centered on Crimea, the once-autonomous region of Ukraine that voted on March 16 to become a part of Russia. Russian President Vladimir Putin has signed a treaty to annex the peninsula, and it now must be approved by the Russian parliament. On Wednesday, the Ukrainian governmentannounced it was pulling out its troops. But Western nations including the United States, the U.K., and Germany, have not [...]

NEWS via FCW.com: Why Maps Matter

March 20, 2014 // 0 Comments

Why maps matter By Frank Konkel Mar 17, 2014 People used to use maps so they wouldn’t get lost. But in recent years, access to the Global Positioning System and the proliferation of mobile technology have made paper-based maps almost irrelevant. Unless you’re in uncharted territory, it’s hard to get lost anymore. Basic geography is as easy as inputting an address and letting your mobile phone tell you how to get there. And as mapping technology advances, it allows for far more than foolproof directions. Federal agencies now use geospatial data, geo-analytics and multi-layered maps for myriad purposes, including gathering intelligence, predicting disease outbreaks and sharing data pools with the public. The allure of mapping lies in its intuitiveness. Even simple “dots on a map can be a powerful way to see trends in data,” said Josh Campbell, geographic information system architect for the Humanitarian Information Unit at the State Department. “Maps [...]

NEWS via Christian Science Monitor: Why African-Americans are moving back to the South

March 16, 2014 // 0 Comments

After decades of moving north, thousands of blacks are returning to their Southern roots for economic and cultural reasons. By Carmen K. Sisson, Correspondent / March 16, 2014 Artist Kia Darceo left Milwaukee for Atlanta, which she calls ‘Black Mecca.’ This is the cover story in the Mar. 17 issue of The Christian Science MonitorWeekly. Melanie Stetson Freeman/Staff WEST POINT, MISS. When Charlie Cox told his friends he was leaving Chicago, no one tried to talk him out of it. After 35 years at General Motors, he was ready to retire. Ready to trade the cold and the crime and the frenetic pace of life for the rivers and fields of his youth. He had grown up in rural West Point, Miss., and he had moved north with his family when he was 9 years old, but somehow his heart had never quite followed. His spirit yearned for the South, and, as the years passed, the memories of his childhood burned brighter until he couldn’t stand it any longer. There was only one problem: [...]

NEWS via Newsweek: The Geography of Autism

March 15, 2014 // 0 Comments

The Geography of Autism By Rob Verger Filed: 3/14/14 at 2:56 PM  | Updated: 3/14/14 at 4:09 PM A new study hints at why autism clusters, but experts caution seeking an easy solutionEnrique De La Osa/Reuters Filed Under: Tech & Science, autism, Science, Studie Researchers have long know that autism is found in clusters. Certain communities and states have rates much higher than the rest of the country — a child born in California is several times more likely to be diagnosed with autism than a child in Alabama, for example. But the question why remains unanswered. The geographical nature of the disorder seems to imply some sort of local, environmental cause. And a new study suggests just that: it found a strong correlation between autism rates and male reproductive system malformations, which can be caused by environmental toxins. There is a complex array of factors that can influence autism rates, though: they seem to be affected by issues as diverse as income level, [...]

NEWS via CNN Money: 11 cities where workers are disappearing

March 14, 2014 // 0 Comments

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) Cincinnati, Cleveland and Dayton, Ohio The labor force has been shrinking in all of Ohio’s major cities other than its state capital, Columbus. Cleveland has lost 52,000 workers, or about 5% of its labor force, since November 2007, and Cincinnati lost 39,000 workers, or about 4% of its labor force, since May 2009, according to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data. Job growth is anemic, particularly in Ohio’s main industry, manufacturing. Signs point to workers giving up, said Amy Hanauer, executive director of Policy Matters Ohio. “I think people are getting discouraged and leaving the labor market,” she said. Ohio lost 388,000 jobs in the financial crisis, and has since gained only about a fifth of them back. Phoenix and Tucson, Ariz. The fallout from the housing bust is still felt here. The construction sector slashed more than half its jobs in the crisis, and they’ve only started to trickle back in the last few months. But the [...]

NEWS via HeritageDaily: 17th- and 18th-century risk of disease through Migration

March 5, 2014 // 0 Comments

17th- and 18th-century risk of disease through Migration HERITAGE March 3, 2014 – No comments The fate of migrants moving to cities in 17th- and 18th-century England demonstrates how a single pathogen could dramatically alter the risks associated with migration and migratory patterns today. Cities have always been a magnet to migrants. In 2010, a tipping point was reached for the first time when, according to the World Health Organization, the majority of the world’s population lived in cities. By 2050, seven out of 10 people will have been born in – or migrated to – a city. One hundred years ago, that figure was two out of 10. Today, cities are generally the safest places to live. If you live in one, you’re likely to be richer than someone living in a rural environment. If you’re richer, you’re likely to live longer. If you live in a city, you have better access to hospitals and healthcare, and you’re more likely to be immunised. But that was not always the [...]

NEWS via Nat’l Geographic: The Growth of Megacities

February 19, 2014 // 0 Comments

Geography in the News: The Growth of Megacities Posted by Neal Lineback of Geography in the NewsTM on February 17, 2014 By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner,  Geography in the NewsTM Megacities’ Expansive Growth For the first time in human history, more of the world’s 6.8 billion people live in cities than in rural areas. That is an incredible demographic and geographic shift since 1950 when only 30 percent of the world’s 2.5 billion inhabitants lived in urban environments. The world’s largest cities, particularly in developing countries, are growing at phenomenal rates. As a growing landless class is attracted by urban opportunities, meager as they might be, these cities’ populations are ballooning to incredible numbers. A May 2010 Christian Science Monitor article on “megacities” predicted that by 2050, almost 70 percent of the world’s estimated 10 billion people—more than the number of people living today—will reside in urban areas. The social, [...]

RESOURCE via Metropolis Mag: These Maps Show How Subway Maps Twist Urban Reality

February 8, 2014 // 0 Comments

These Maps Show How Subway Maps Twist Urban Reality Komal Sharma A new project by historian Benjamin M. Schmidt reveals how wrong subway maps really are. Courtesy Benjamin M. Schmidt It’s not a secret that our subway maps distort the geographies of the metropoles they claim to represent. When we traverse a city everyday with an MTA (Metropolitan Transportation Authority NY) or WMATA map (Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority), our conception of the city—its boundaries, expanses—easily becomes scrambled. For instance, both Washington’s dense inner core and its spread-out outskirts are all shown on the same scale. In a grid city like Manhattan there might be some semblance of similarity, but in most other cities, reality on the ground is completely different. A new project developed at Northeastern University tackles these problems head on. Benjamin M. Schmidt, a professor of history, has designed interactive digital maps of Boston, New York and Washington that [...]

NEWS: Urban Observatory comes to life at Esri International User Conference | SmartBlogs

July 11, 2013 // 0 Comments

Esri (GIS Mapping Software, Solutions, Service, Map Apps, and Data) just launched an interactive site that allows users to compare/contrast map data between 16 major cities (so far). Themes that can be compared include: Commercial/Industrial zones Roadspeed/Traffic/Airports Housing Density/ Population Density/Senior population/Youth population Public space Temperature Urban Footprint New development Urban Observatory comes to life at Esri International User Conference | SmartBlogs [...]
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