data visualization

LESSON PLAN: Global Migration Flow & Data Visualization

January 12, 2017 // 0 Comments

Description:  This worksheet is inspired by the Global International Migration Flows website by the Wittgenstein Centre. It uses migration data over the course of 5-year periods in a circular-flow chart. The attached worksheet asks students to identify the largest migration flows both in and out of the respective regions. It also asks that they identify the regions that have the largest interregional migrations. Objective: Students will identify where the world’s largest migration flows are occurring between regions. AP Objectives:  Apply the concepts of forced and voluntary migration to historical and contemporary examples. Forced migrations include those involving refugees, internally displaced persons, and asylum seekers. Voluntary migrations may be transnational, internal, chain, step, and rural to urban. Patterns of voluntary and forced migration may be affected by distance and physical features. Procedure: Introduce vocabulary to students: Interregional migration, [...]

VIDEO via FreeBase: Charting Culture by Mapping Migration

August 14, 2014 // 0 Comments

Video: Thousands of Years of Human Migration in Five Minutes By Lisa Raffensperger | July 31, 2014 2:00 pm   It’s enough to put an old-fashioned family tree to shame. A visualization of the migration routes of more than 150,000 people, from 600 BC to the present day, brings to life human history in the Western world in an engrossing and novel way. The model, produced by Maximilian Schich, at the University of Texas at Dallas, along with collaborators from the U.S., Switzerland and Hungary, represents the birth and death dates and locations of individual people. These data came from community database Freebase, a well-known German encyclopedia of the world’s artists, and Getty’s online artist names database. The sample included such notable individuals as David, King of Israel, and Leonardo da Vinci, but, since Freebase is editable by anyone, it also included average folk. “You will have people where we know that there was a carpenter in Nuremberg, who lived from 1530 to [...]
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