demographics

NEWS via StarTribune: In Africa, hopes that surging population will drive growth are overblown

March 15, 2014 // 2 Comments

How unusual is Africa’s demography? U.N. estimates of slowing birth rates predicted an economic surge, but trends have fallen short, as have manufacturing and private investment. If you refer to Algeria and Tunisia in the north and Botswana and South Africa in the south, you may answer: not that unusual. In the early 1960s those nations had fertility rates of between 5.5 and 7.5, about the same as rates in Brazil, China, Indonesia and Mexico at the time. Now, all of those countries’ fertility rates are between 1.5 and 3.0. The main difference is that the Asian and Latin American nations saw their fertility decline at a fairly steady pace over the past 50 years, whereas the African ones saw a sharp decline beginning in the mid-1980s. In a recent study, demographers Jean-Pierre Guengant and John May say the north and south of the continent are exceptions. Most of Africa is catching up too little, too late. The result is that the continent’s overall population will rise sharply, [...]

NEWS via PewResearch: Global Population Estimates by Age, 1950-2050-INTERACTIVE

February 26, 2014 // 0 Comments

JANUARY 30, 2014 Global Population Estimates by Age, 1950-2050 The demographic future for the U.S. and the world looks very different than the recent past. Growth from 1950 to 2010 was rapid—the global population nearly tripled, and the U.S. population doubled. However, population growth from 2010 to 2050 is projected to be significantly slower and is expected to tilt strongly to the oldest age groups, both globally and in the U.S. Source: United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, World Population Prospects: 2012 Revision, June [...]

NEWS via the Guardian: Time running out for China’s one-child policy after three decades

February 18, 2014 // 0 Comments

Time running out for China’s one-child policy after three decades As list of exemptions grows, experts predict scrapping of rule said to have prevented 400m births Even if the one-child policy is scrapped, many Chinese couples say they are unlikely to have bigger families because of the expense. Photograph: Afp/AFP/Getty Images Chen Xi once saw the one-child policy as a brick wall, unyielding and inevitable. Now she considers it a nuisance. The turning point came in November when, just as she began the fifth month of her pregnancy, Beijing announced a big change to the contentious policy, allowing couples to have two children if one parent is an only child. Chen, a 28-year-old employee at a state-owned enterprise, should qualify – her husband does have siblings, but she does not. Yet her hopes may be dashed: although she is pregnant with her first child, she lives with her husband’s 16-year-old daughter from a previous marriage, and family planning officials may [...]

NEWS via Pew Research Center: As the population grays, Americans stay upbeat

February 15, 2014 // 1 Comment

As the population grays, Americans stay upbeat BY RAKESH KOCHHARLEAVE A COMMENT One-in-five Americans are expected to be 65 and older by mid-century, and this could be a problem for the country. There is worry that government and household finances may be pushed to the brink by rising pension and health care expenditures. Economic growth, we are warned, might suffer with fewer workers and more retirees. But what does the public think? It may come as a surprise that the American public is pretty optimistic. In a Pew Research Center survey, only about one-in-four Americans say the growing number of older people is a major problem for the country, nearly two-thirds are confident they will have an adequate standard of living in their old age, and almost one-half say that individuals are primarily responsible for their own economic well-being as they get older. These opinions differ sharply from public opinion in most of the 20 other countries that we surveyed. Americans are among the [...]

NEWS via CNN: New Chinese law: Visit your Parents

July 2, 2013 // 0 Comments

Human Imprint Synopsis: In a country where a one-child policy and an aging population prevail, the traditional family is being turned on its head. China is a rapidly developing country that is improving its economic position by sending more of their children to universities, even abroad.  However, as the money starts to come in, dependents of the “little-prince” generation are wondering if their kid will ever come back home to take care of them. Recently, the “Law of Protection of Rights and Interests of the Aged” was established in an effort to make sure that kids are not turning their back on their parents. A social necessity or infringement of human rights? What do you think? —————————- Story Via: New Chinese law: Visit your parents – CNN.com. New Chinese law: Visit your parents By Meng Meng and Katie Hunt, for CNN updated 6:36 AM EDT, Tue July 2, 2013 In China, visit parents or face jail? [...]
Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On Pinterest