disease

NEWS via DeccaChronicle: Aged population to be 2 billion by 2050 in India

March 26, 2014 // 0 Comments

Aged population to be 2 billion by 2050 in India DC CORRESPONDENT | March 19, 2014, 06.03 am  Picture for representation purpose. Chennai: The elderly population grows at a faster rate and so too the diseases. According to WHO, persons aged abo-ve 60 years will touch two billion by 2050. “With the increase in life expectancy, people now tend to live longer but we need more geriatricians to address their health problems,” point out health experts. Data released by the Union ministry of health and family welfare shows that life expectancy in India has gone up by five years, from 62.3 years for males and 63.9 years for females in 2001-2005 to 67.3 years and 69.6 years respectively in 2011-2015. India’s first professor in geriatric medicine, Dr V.S. Natarajan says we need to address not just the medical problems but social problems. “How many senior citizens live in our country alone while their children live in abroad? They have the money, but what about isolation and leading [...]

NEWS via FCW.com: Why Maps Matter

March 20, 2014 // 0 Comments

Why maps matter By Frank Konkel Mar 17, 2014 People used to use maps so they wouldn’t get lost. But in recent years, access to the Global Positioning System and the proliferation of mobile technology have made paper-based maps almost irrelevant. Unless you’re in uncharted territory, it’s hard to get lost anymore. Basic geography is as easy as inputting an address and letting your mobile phone tell you how to get there. And as mapping technology advances, it allows for far more than foolproof directions. Federal agencies now use geospatial data, geo-analytics and multi-layered maps for myriad purposes, including gathering intelligence, predicting disease outbreaks and sharing data pools with the public. The allure of mapping lies in its intuitiveness. Even simple “dots on a map can be a powerful way to see trends in data,” said Josh Campbell, geographic information system architect for the Humanitarian Information Unit at the State Department. “Maps [...]

NEWS via Newsweek: The Geography of Autism

March 15, 2014 // 0 Comments

The Geography of Autism By Rob Verger Filed: 3/14/14 at 2:56 PM  | Updated: 3/14/14 at 4:09 PM A new study hints at why autism clusters, but experts caution seeking an easy solutionEnrique De La Osa/Reuters Filed Under: Tech & Science, autism, Science, Studie Researchers have long know that autism is found in clusters. Certain communities and states have rates much higher than the rest of the country — a child born in California is several times more likely to be diagnosed with autism than a child in Alabama, for example. But the question why remains unanswered. The geographical nature of the disorder seems to imply some sort of local, environmental cause. And a new study suggests just that: it found a strong correlation between autism rates and male reproductive system malformations, which can be caused by environmental toxins. There is a complex array of factors that can influence autism rates, though: they seem to be affected by issues as diverse as income level, [...]

NEWS via TurkishPress: World’s population at risk from organism-borne diseases

March 14, 2014 // 0 Comments

World’s population at risk from organism-borne diseases Tuesday, March 11, 2014 GENEVA – The World Health Organization (WHO) has released information stating that more than half of the world`s population is at risk from vector-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue. Diseases such as these are commonly found in tropical and sub-tropical regions and places where access to safe drinking-water and sanitation systems is problematic. They are spread via vectors which are small organisms, such as mosquitoes, sandflies and ticks, which transmit pathogens and parasites from one infected person, or animal, to another causing serious disease in human populations. Vector-borne diseases account for an estimated 17 percent of the world`s infectious diseases with the most deadly being malaria, which caused an estimated 660,000 deaths in 2010, according to WHO. However, the world`s fastest growing vector-borne disease is dengue, with a 30-fold increase in cases of the disease over the [...]

NEWS via HeritageDaily: 17th- and 18th-century risk of disease through Migration

March 5, 2014 // 0 Comments

17th- and 18th-century risk of disease through Migration HERITAGE March 3, 2014 – No comments The fate of migrants moving to cities in 17th- and 18th-century England demonstrates how a single pathogen could dramatically alter the risks associated with migration and migratory patterns today. Cities have always been a magnet to migrants. In 2010, a tipping point was reached for the first time when, according to the World Health Organization, the majority of the world’s population lived in cities. By 2050, seven out of 10 people will have been born in – or migrated to – a city. One hundred years ago, that figure was two out of 10. Today, cities are generally the safest places to live. If you live in one, you’re likely to be richer than someone living in a rural environment. If you’re richer, you’re likely to live longer. If you live in a city, you have better access to hospitals and healthcare, and you’re more likely to be immunised. But that was not always the [...]

NEWS: UN: 6.6 Million Children Under 5 Died Last Year – ABC News

September 27, 2013 // 0 Comments

UN: 6.6 Million Children Under 5 Died Last Year LAGOS, Nigeria September 13, 2013 (AP) By CARLEY PETESCH Associated Press Childhood death rates around the world have halved since 1990 but an estimated 6.6 million children under the age of 5 still died last year, the U.N. children’s agency said Friday. Nearly half of all children who die are in five countries: Nigeria, Congo, India, Pakistan and China, it said in a report. “Progress can and must be made,” said Anthony Lake, UNICEF’s executive director. “When concerted action, sound strategies, adequate resources and strong political will are harnessed in support of child and maternal survival, dramatic reductions in child mortality aren’t just feasible, they are morally imperative.” The top killers are malaria, pneumonia and diarrhea, the report said, taking the lives of about 6,000 children under age 5 daily. A lack of nutrition contributes to almost half of these deaths, the U.N. said. [...]
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