epidemiology

Illustrated Textbook: The Importance of the Spatial Perspective

August 7, 2017 // 0 Comments

Alright! This is what all of you John Snow geeks have been waiting for. Oh, you thought I was talking about Game of Thrones!… …No no…. Dr. John Snow of the London cholera epidemic-the father of epidemiology. This is one of my favorite pages so far and I am very excited to share it with you, and hopefully your students. We learn why the SPATIAL PERSPECTIVE is so darn important and what maps and toilet paper have in common. Click below to read the newest page. In my hunting for my favorite John Snow materials, I found this interactive game where students need to guess which pump was tainted (it is very basic, but does the job). If you are into primary source documents, you can have your students read Dr. Snow’s report on the cholera outbreak here. And if you are into pre-made worksheets, I found a great one from Oregon State. More recently, I saw a video going around about how cholera spreads from the Global Health Media Project, it is very well done and I think [...]

NEWS via Newsweek: The Geography of Autism

March 15, 2014 // 0 Comments

The Geography of Autism By Rob Verger Filed: 3/14/14 at 2:56 PM  | Updated: 3/14/14 at 4:09 PM A new study hints at why autism clusters, but experts caution seeking an easy solutionEnrique De La Osa/Reuters Filed Under: Tech & Science, autism, Science, Studie Researchers have long know that autism is found in clusters. Certain communities and states have rates much higher than the rest of the country — a child born in California is several times more likely to be diagnosed with autism than a child in Alabama, for example. But the question why remains unanswered. The geographical nature of the disorder seems to imply some sort of local, environmental cause. And a new study suggests just that: it found a strong correlation between autism rates and male reproductive system malformations, which can be caused by environmental toxins. There is a complex array of factors that can influence autism rates, though: they seem to be affected by issues as diverse as income level, [...]

NEWS via HeritageDaily: 17th- and 18th-century risk of disease through Migration

March 5, 2014 // 0 Comments

17th- and 18th-century risk of disease through Migration HERITAGE March 3, 2014 – No comments The fate of migrants moving to cities in 17th- and 18th-century England demonstrates how a single pathogen could dramatically alter the risks associated with migration and migratory patterns today. Cities have always been a magnet to migrants. In 2010, a tipping point was reached for the first time when, according to the World Health Organization, the majority of the world’s population lived in cities. By 2050, seven out of 10 people will have been born in – or migrated to – a city. One hundred years ago, that figure was two out of 10. Today, cities are generally the safest places to live. If you live in one, you’re likely to be richer than someone living in a rural environment. If you’re richer, you’re likely to live longer. If you live in a city, you have better access to hospitals and healthcare, and you’re more likely to be immunised. But that was not always the [...]
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