folk

NEWS via theguardian: Moana: progressive paean to Polynesia – or another of Disney’s cultural blunders?

January 7, 2017 // 0 Comments

Moana: The Progressive Paean to Polynesia or another of Disney’s Cultural Blunders? This is an article that discusses whether Moana, the Disney movie, is an example of cultural appropriation or an attempt to be culturally inclusive. Human Geography Application: This would be a good article to step off into a debate among students, whether Moana is an example of cultural appropriation or an attempt to be culturally inclusive. This would be appropriate when discussing ethnicity, commodification, cultural insensitivities, folk vs. pop [...]

VIDEO via FreeBase: Charting Culture by Mapping Migration

August 14, 2014 // 0 Comments

Video: Thousands of Years of Human Migration in Five Minutes By Lisa Raffensperger | July 31, 2014 2:00 pm   It’s enough to put an old-fashioned family tree to shame. A visualization of the migration routes of more than 150,000 people, from 600 BC to the present day, brings to life human history in the Western world in an engrossing and novel way. The model, produced by Maximilian Schich, at the University of Texas at Dallas, along with collaborators from the U.S., Switzerland and Hungary, represents the birth and death dates and locations of individual people. These data came from community database Freebase, a well-known German encyclopedia of the world’s artists, and Getty’s online artist names database. The sample included such notable individuals as David, King of Israel, and Leonardo da Vinci, but, since Freebase is editable by anyone, it also included average folk. “You will have people where we know that there was a carpenter in Nuremberg, who lived from 1530 to [...]

NEWS via Mashable: Mapmakers Debate How to Define Crimea

March 21, 2014 // 0 Comments

Mapmakers Debate How to Define Crimea A cartographer at work, circa 1930.IMAGE: VINTAGE IMAGES/HULTON ARCHIVE/GETTY IMAGES BY COLIN DAILEDA1 DAY AGO Much of the world is watching how the high-stakes tug-of-war over Crimea will play out, but few groups of professionals are more invested than cartographers. Cartographers are tasked with mapping the political dimensions of the globe. That means when a piece of land switches ownership between countries, it’s their job to decide whether they want to make that change official. The latest debate for this small but influential club is centered on Crimea, the once-autonomous region of Ukraine that voted on March 16 to become a part of Russia. Russian President Vladimir Putin has signed a treaty to annex the peninsula, and it now must be approved by the Russian parliament. On Wednesday, the Ukrainian governmentannounced it was pulling out its troops. But Western nations including the United States, the U.K., and Germany, have not [...]

NEWS via FCW.com: Why Maps Matter

March 20, 2014 // 0 Comments

Why maps matter By Frank Konkel Mar 17, 2014 People used to use maps so they wouldn’t get lost. But in recent years, access to the Global Positioning System and the proliferation of mobile technology have made paper-based maps almost irrelevant. Unless you’re in uncharted territory, it’s hard to get lost anymore. Basic geography is as easy as inputting an address and letting your mobile phone tell you how to get there. And as mapping technology advances, it allows for far more than foolproof directions. Federal agencies now use geospatial data, geo-analytics and multi-layered maps for myriad purposes, including gathering intelligence, predicting disease outbreaks and sharing data pools with the public. The allure of mapping lies in its intuitiveness. Even simple “dots on a map can be a powerful way to see trends in data,” said Josh Campbell, geographic information system architect for the Humanitarian Information Unit at the State Department. “Maps [...]

NEWS via NPR: An Imaginary Town Becomes Real, Then Not. True Story

March 18, 2014 // 0 Comments

by ROBERT KRULWICH March 18, 2014 4:43 PM This is the story of a totally made-up place that suddenly became real — and then, strangely, undid itself and became a fantasy again. Imagine Pinocchio becoming a real boy and then going back to being a puppet. That’s what happened here — but this is a true story. It’s about a place in upstate New York called Agloe. You can see it here, circled in blue …  … just up the road from Roscoe and Rockland. In the 1930s (I learned from Frank Jacobs’ excellent blog, Strange Maps), there was no town on that stretch between Rockland and nearby Beaverkill — just a dirt road. This wasn’t an important or often visited place, which made it a perfect spot for what’s called a “paper town,” or a map “trap.” Pirate-Protected Maps Companies that create maps get their work copied all the time. You hire a draftsman. You check spellings, you work on the colors, you get all the cities in the [...]

NEWS via PRI: A Haitian artist fights to preserve the vodou religion

January 21, 2014 // 0 Comments

Listen to the full story here  A Haitian artist fights to preserve the vodou religion Credit: Swoan Parker/Reuters A vodou worshipper takes part in festivities on the first day of the Haitian Festival of Ancestors in Port-au-Prince. Erol Josué is a dancer, a recording artist, a vodou priest, and an expert on the vodou religion’s culture and history. “They beat me in the name of Jesus,” Josué sings in one song. “They burn me in the name of Jesus.” The lyrics of this old vodou song date back to slavery days in the 18th Century, but their warning rings true today for some vodou practitioners — or vodouisants — who feel under attack. The old joke goes that Haiti is 70 percent Catholic, 30 percent Protestant and 100 percent Vodou. For Josué, this is no joking matter. Last year, he took a government job as head of Haiti’s National Ethnology Office. He’s on a mission to get Haitians to realize that they need to embrace their vodou heritage [...]
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