food

VIDEO via NGS: Food by the Numbers: Feeding Our Hungry Planet

October 16, 2014 // 0 Comments

By 2050, the world’s population will likely increase 35 percent. But is growing more food the only option—or even the best? National Geographic investigates the challenges and solutions to feeding everyone on our planet, based on an eight-month series in National Geographic magazine. Visit natgeofood.com for ongoing coverage of food [...]

VIDEO via Frontline: India-The Missing Girls

March 21, 2014 // 0 Comments

Frontline Roughtcut Website In 2006, when my wife and I traveled to India to live and work, the one issue that kept grabbing our attention was northern India’s deep cultural preference for sons over daughters. The desire for sons can be so great, that some families, after having a girl or two, will abort female fetuses until they bear a son. The practice is called female feticide or sex selection. In some ways this is a very old tale. Long before medical abortion became available, unwanted girls were killed after birth or not given enough food and medicine to survive. But modern technology has changed that. Ultrasound machines, which make it possible to determine the gender of a fetus, have spread from big city hospitals to small country clinics. Portable machines are taken to remote villages by motorcycle. As a consequence, infanticide has given way to feticide. Despite a law banning sex selective abortion in force for a decade, as many as half a million female fetuses are [...]

NEWS via CNN: Plugging China’s talent pool

March 20, 2014 // 0 Comments

Plugging China’s talent pool By Zarina Banu for CNN March 20, 2014 — Updated 0603 GMT (1403 HKT) Many are leaving China for reasons like education, food and wealth security and air quality. STORY HIGHLIGHTS China sees 8.5 million mainly middle-class living abroad with less than 10% moving in Paper in China calls exodus “the world’s worst brain drain” Hong Kong (CNN) — “Culture is not the main reason why most Chinese people leave. This is a romantic view. Most people leave China because of practical reasons like education, food and wealth security and air quality.” This is the view of Li Chen, who moved to Hong Kong from the mainland two years ago. A combination of pragmatism and aspiration led the 32-year-old Masters of Journalism student to leave. He said when his wife was offered the chance to relocate to Hong Kong, the timing for the couple was just right. The move allowed Li to pursue his passion for photography and will earn him [...]

NEWS via NPR: Who Had Richer Parents, Doctors Or Artists

March 18, 2014 // 0 Comments

Who Had Richer Parents, Doctors Or Artists A few weeks ago, we were sitting around the office arguing over this simple question: Who had richer parents, journalists or people working in finance? Doctors or artists? More generally: What’s the link between household income during childhood and job choice during adulthood? After some poking around, we figured out how to settle the argument. A government survey has tracked more than 12,000 people for decades. It allowed us to look at the same group of people in 1979 and 2010 — from a time when most were teenagers to the time when they were middle-aged and, for the most part, gainfully employed. We crunched the data a few ways. First, here’s a table that answers our basic question. It links peoples’ jobs as adults in 2010 to their parents’ income when they were kids in 1979. Job As Adult Household Income During Childhood Farming, Fishing, And Forestry less than $35,000 Child Care Workers, Home Care Workers, etc. [...]

NEWS via CNN: Crimea-Economic fallout of a ‘yes’ vote

March 16, 2014 // 0 Comments

Crimea: Economic fallout of a ‘yes’ vote By Alanna Petroff and Mark Thompson  @CNNMoney March 15, 2014: 7:54 AM ET Crimea is voting on Sunday in a referendum to decide if the region should break from Ukraine and join Russia.  LONDON (CNNMoney) The Ukrainian region of Crimea votes Sunday on whether to join Russia, a move that could tip Europe back into a Cold War with its powerful eastern neighbor. The West has called the vote illegal, saying Russian military activity in Crimea violates Ukraine’s sovereignty and will influence the outcome of the referendum. U.S. and European leaders say Russia will pay a price for annexing Crimea, and German Chancellor Angela Merkel has warned of a potential “catastrophe.” Related: Live coverage of the crisis in Ukraine If, as expected, Crimeans choose Russia over Ukraine, the fallout could ultimately affect economic growth, trade, investment and energy supplies. Sanctions: Western powers may move as early as Monday [...]

NEWS via Christian Science Monitor: Why African-Americans are moving back to the South

March 16, 2014 // 0 Comments

After decades of moving north, thousands of blacks are returning to their Southern roots for economic and cultural reasons. By Carmen K. Sisson, Correspondent / March 16, 2014 Artist Kia Darceo left Milwaukee for Atlanta, which she calls ‘Black Mecca.’ This is the cover story in the Mar. 17 issue of The Christian Science MonitorWeekly. Melanie Stetson Freeman/Staff WEST POINT, MISS. When Charlie Cox told his friends he was leaving Chicago, no one tried to talk him out of it. After 35 years at General Motors, he was ready to retire. Ready to trade the cold and the crime and the frenetic pace of life for the rivers and fields of his youth. He had grown up in rural West Point, Miss., and he had moved north with his family when he was 9 years old, but somehow his heart had never quite followed. His spirit yearned for the South, and, as the years passed, the memories of his childhood burned brighter until he couldn’t stand it any longer. There was only one problem: [...]

News via India.com: As the world population increases, eating insects could soon become mainstream

March 11, 2014 // 0 Comments

As the world population increases, eating insects could soon become mainstream Agencies March 9, 2014 at 7:31 pm How would you react if your neighborhood restaurant serves you a menu that only lists cuisines prepared from caterpillars or termites? People would soon have no choice but to consume insects as it would be increasingly difficult to feed the burgeoning world population — close to 8 billion now — in near future, warned the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). A latest FAO report, titled ‘Edible Insects: Future Prospects for Food and Feed Security’, lists ‘entomophagy’ — a diet supplemented by insects that has health and environmental benefits. How can these insects satiate your palate in years to come? Mopane caterpillars is one such insect. It is traditionally boiled in salted water and dried in sun before eating. It can last for several months without refrigeration. According to FAO, these are a good source of potassium, sodium, [...]

NEWS via NPR: The Katydid Dilemma: Will You Eat Insects?

January 17, 2014 // 0 Comments

Could this be the onset of the Fourth AGRICULTURAL REVOLUTION? One thing is for sure, it would have made ESTER BOSERUP smile. -Human Imprint ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Reblog via NPR The Katydid Dilemma: Will You Eat Insects? by BARBARA J. KING January 17, 201411:13 AM It’s right there on the dinner menu at Oyamel (a Washington, D.C., restaurant), listed under the “authentic Mexican tacos” section: Chapulines The legendary Oaxacan specialty of sauteed grasshoppers, shallots, tequila and guacamole. $5.00 Whether it’s sauteed grasshoppers at Oyamel or katydid grilled cheese sandwiches prepared for the annual Bug Fair at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles, insects are the new darlings of the avant-garde food world. At least that’s the message in the chapter called “Grub” from Dana Goodyear’s book Anything that Moves: Renegade Chefs, Fearless Eaters, and the Making of a New American Food Culture. Which animals we [...]

NEWS via: The real solution to South Africa’s food problem – Opinion – Al Jazeera English

September 12, 2013 // 0 Comments

As South Africa has grown more urban, so have poverty and hunger migrated to its cities. While the government of South Africa sees increasing penetration of supermarkets into poorer neighbourhoods as a way to encourage economic development and increase access to food, this strategy is inherently limited. In South Africa, urbanisation has contributed to a rapid increase in poverty and a rising population of urbanites who are undernourished. Sixty percent of South Africa’s population is now urbanised, and this figure is projected to reach 80 percent by 2050. In Cape Town, a 2011 survey found that over 80 percent of households were either moderately or severely food insecure in sampled low income neighbourhoods. In addition to overall caloric food insecurity, households were found to have limited dietary diversity. There is a deep rift in the international food policy community about the role of supermarkets in addressing urban hunger. One group sees “food deserts,” or [...]

NEWS via PRI: Low-Water Lunch: A Chinese Breakthrough on Irrigation?

July 11, 2013 // 0 Comments

Esther Boserup would be proud! It looks as though the Chinese have created a new irrigation system that allows plants to use water only as it needs-creating a more sustainable agricultural method to support it’s exploding population. Take that Malthus. Low-Water Lunch: A Chinese Breakthrough on Irrigation? | @pritheworld. Agronomist Kim Ji-Seok points to soil with trace irrigation that is moist, but not wet. (Photo: Mary Kay [...]
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