geography

NEWS via theguardian: Moana: progressive paean to Polynesia – or another of Disney’s cultural blunders?

January 7, 2017 // 0 Comments

Moana: The Progressive Paean to Polynesia or another of Disney’s Cultural Blunders? This is an article that discusses whether Moana, the Disney movie, is an example of cultural appropriation or an attempt to be culturally inclusive. Human Geography Application: This would be a good article to step off into a debate among students, whether Moana is an example of cultural appropriation or an attempt to be culturally inclusive. This would be appropriate when discussing ethnicity, commodification, cultural insensitivities, folk vs. pop [...]

ARTICLE via VOX: 15 before-and-after images that show how we’re transforming the planet

January 6, 2017 // 0 Comments

15 Before and After Images that Show How We’re Transforming the Planet This article includes fifteen aerial images of the Earth and it’s physical transformation as a result of human activity. Human Geography Application: This article would be useful within the Nature & Perspectives unit and the discussion of the importance of new age mapping, remote sensing, and human-environment interaction. You could also swing this if discussing the man-land tradition/human-environment interaction (Pattison and 5 [...]

INTERACTIVE via New York Times: Where Is America’s Heartland? Pick Your Map

January 5, 2017 // 0 Comments

Where is America’s Heartland? Pick your Map This short interactive has users choose a map that they feel best represents the “American Heartland.” After voting, they will see a tally and an article that discusses the topic of what the Heartland means to other people. Human Geography Application: This would be a good, 2 minute activity to direct students with 1:1 devices after discussing vernacular [...]

VIDEO via New York Times: A Conversation With Asians on Race

January 4, 2017 // 0 Comments

A Conversation with Asian-Americans on Race This video shows Asian Americans confronting stereotypes about their own community. Human Geography Application: This would be a great clip to show while discussion ethnicity. It would play very well with classrooms that have an Asian-American perspective, or to show students that there are stereotypes within other ethnic groups that might otherwise go [...]

Interactive via PBS: Can You Tell Someone’s Race by Looking at Them?

January 3, 2017 // 0 Comments

Race: The Power of Illusion Via PBS:  How easy is it to group people into “races” based on appearance? What about using individual traits? Does everybody classify the same way? Try your hand at “sorting” individuals and see if it matches how people think of themselves. Or explore how we might sort people by physical traits. Human Geography Application: After a lecture/discussion about the topic of race, ethnicity, and nationality, have your students complete this PBS interactive. It helps show them what they really don’t know about race based upon appearances. This could be a short 5-minute 1:1 activity on a device that supports flash, or it could stretch an entire block with interwoven discussion on race and [...]

2016 AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY COLLABORATIVE EDUCATOR RUBRIC (FOR FUN)

May 15, 2016 // 0 Comments

The 2016 AP Human Geography FRQs are officially released! How exciting and nerdy. Last year I created a collaborative Google Doc where teachers could brainstorm possible responses to the FRQs.  It was so much fun to see a hundred teachers looking at the document at same time, so let’s do it again! Simply open the Google doc and type to edit. Instead of deleting others’ responses, simply use the strike through option if you feel a response wouldn’t be accepted (a reason next to it is always nice). Just because you see 2-3 bullet points doesn’t mean you can’t hit enter to add another possible response. Let’s have some fun collaborating! TAKE ME TO THE [...]

2015 Edition ~ AP Human Geography FRQ and Exam Breakdown

August 19, 2015 // 2 Comments

2015 FRQ AP HuGe Breakdown DO2015-FRQ-AP-HuGe-Breakdown-DOCC  <—-To print on multiple pages LINK TO .PNG FILE FOR PRINTING. I really enjoy creating infographics using Piktochart.com. My 2014 edition was great fun to make and a good lesson in infographics. I would love to implement these more into my class and have students visually depict geographic data. At first glance, good infographics are very clean, effective in their message, and visually appealing. After some thought and attempts, they are not so easy after all. People get degrees in this stuff! A lesson plan on using infographics requires a vision and even maybe some tutelage from an art teacher. Design and color, combined with information can be beautiful. While I am artistically inclined, I am not formally trained. I am sure that a professional would put me to shame, but here is my best attempt at my second edition of the FRQ and Exam Score infographic. Some features are interactive so accessing from the URL [...]

RESOURCE: AP HuGe Recommended Texts

April 20, 2015 // 0 Comments

The following list is taken from the AP Human Geography Teacher’s Guide. The list looks a little dated, nevertheless, the authors have updated versions of their texts. ———————– Textbooks de Blij, H. J., and Alexander B. Murphy. Human Geography: Culture, Society, and Space. 7th ed. New York: John Wiley, 2003. Fellmann, Jerome D., Arthur Getis, and Judith Getis. Human Geography: Landscapes of Human Activities. 8th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2005. Jordan-Bychkov, Terry G., and Mona Domosh. The Human Mosaic: A Thematic Introduction to Cultural Geography. 9th ed. New York: W. H. Freeman, 2003. Knox, Paul L., and Sallie A. Marston. Places and Regions in Global Context: Human Geography. 3rd ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 2004. Kuby, Michael, John Harner, and Patricia Gober. Human Geography in Action. 3rd ed. New York: John Wiley, 2004. Norton, William. Human Geography. 5th ed. Don Mills, Ont.: Oxford University Press, 2004. [...]

RESOURCE: Human Geography FRQ Writing Commands

July 19, 2014 // 1 Comment

After creating the Visual.ly infographic based upon AP’s previous FRQ exams, I created a more user-friendly guide for teachers and students to use in preparation for their exams. I would love to say that these protocols can also work for Ap Gov., Econ, Macro, Micro, Psychology, and U.S. but we can not since these protocols are based off observations of how the Human Geography rubrics scored each command. FRQ Writing Command Protocols with Good Examples Nevertheless, I think they are very good protocols for teaching a student how to answer these types of questions in any class. I received a writing protocol at an AP conference about 6-7 years ago, and I used to hand it out to students. Though a great jumping off point, my students were still fuzzy on what some of the differences were between certain writing prompts and I also think that this guide better reflects the commands that AP Human Geography use through the most current rubrics. How I use the guide I am currently teaching [...]

Observations from the 2014 AP Human Geography Reading

June 11, 2014 // 4 Comments

Once again the AP Human Geography reading was a success. I still firmly believe that this group pf 500+ teachers and professors have GOT to be the most extraordinary and interesting people than any other group of readers. The stories that we all overhear while riding up the escalator for lunch are unbelievable and  inspires me to keep pushing to be a better teacher than I was yesterday. Never mind the 1125 free response questions that I graded- this is by far the best professional development that I can ever get. I am very thankful for a productive professional development night, and all of the other “professional development” nights outside of the convention center. After pondering the rubric that we used for grading and discussing it with my table, I decided to do some further research into the previous years and see what types of verbs that the FRQ test requests the students to answer. Some of my findings were interesting and provoked more thought while others were [...]

NEWS via FCW.com: Why Maps Matter

March 20, 2014 // 0 Comments

Why maps matter By Frank Konkel Mar 17, 2014 People used to use maps so they wouldn’t get lost. But in recent years, access to the Global Positioning System and the proliferation of mobile technology have made paper-based maps almost irrelevant. Unless you’re in uncharted territory, it’s hard to get lost anymore. Basic geography is as easy as inputting an address and letting your mobile phone tell you how to get there. And as mapping technology advances, it allows for far more than foolproof directions. Federal agencies now use geospatial data, geo-analytics and multi-layered maps for myriad purposes, including gathering intelligence, predicting disease outbreaks and sharing data pools with the public. The allure of mapping lies in its intuitiveness. Even simple “dots on a map can be a powerful way to see trends in data,” said Josh Campbell, geographic information system architect for the Humanitarian Information Unit at the State Department. “Maps [...]

NEWS via Newsweek: The Geography of Autism

March 15, 2014 // 0 Comments

The Geography of Autism By Rob Verger Filed: 3/14/14 at 2:56 PM  | Updated: 3/14/14 at 4:09 PM A new study hints at why autism clusters, but experts caution seeking an easy solutionEnrique De La Osa/Reuters Filed Under: Tech & Science, autism, Science, Studie Researchers have long know that autism is found in clusters. Certain communities and states have rates much higher than the rest of the country — a child born in California is several times more likely to be diagnosed with autism than a child in Alabama, for example. But the question why remains unanswered. The geographical nature of the disorder seems to imply some sort of local, environmental cause. And a new study suggests just that: it found a strong correlation between autism rates and male reproductive system malformations, which can be caused by environmental toxins. There is a complex array of factors that can influence autism rates, though: they seem to be affected by issues as diverse as income level, [...]

NEWS via NGS: Genghis Khan’s Secret Weapon Was Rain

March 14, 2014 // 0 Comments

Tree-ring studies suggest that a long wet spell gave him the resources to invade and conquer. Some 800 years ago, ancestors of modern Mongolians conquered the world on horseback. A period of unusually mild weather may have helped propel them by making them rich in livestock. Roff Smith National Geographic PUBLISHED MARCH 10, 2014 For unsuspecting herdsmen in the 13th century, April showers didn’t bring May flowers—they brought Mongol hordes. New research by tree-ring scientists from Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and West Virginia University may have uncovered the reason why an obscure band of nomadic Mongol horsemen were able to sweep through much of Asia in a few meteoric decades 800 years ago, conquering everything in their path: They enjoyed an unprecedented, and yet-to-be-repeated, 15-year run of bountiful rains and mild weather on the normally cold and arid steppes. By sampling tree rings in the gnarled and twisted Siberian pines in the [...]

NEWS via Al Jazeera: How the North Ended up on Top of the Map

February 23, 2014 // 0 Comments

How the north ended up on top of the map by Nick Danforth @ajam February 16, 2014 A cartographic history of what’s up McArthur’s Universal Corrective Map of the World.Flickr A world map drawn by the Moroccan cartographer Muhammad al-Idrisi for King Roger of Sicily, 1154. Wikipedia Why do maps always show the north as up? For those who don’t just take it for granted, the common answer is that Europeans made the maps and they wanted to be on top. But there’s really no good reason for the north to claim top-notch cartographic real estate over any other bearing, as an examination of old maps from different places and periods can confirm. The profound arbitrariness of our current cartographic conventions was made evident by McArthur’s Universal Corrective Map of the World, an iconic “upside down” view of the world that recently celebrated its 35th anniversary. Launched by Australian Stuart McArthur on Jan. 26, 1979 (Australia Day, naturally), this map is supposed to [...]

INTERACTIVE: Racial Dot Maps via: University of Va.

February 16, 2014 // 1 Comment

The Racial Dot Map One Dot Per Person for the Entire United States Created by Dustin Cable, July 2013 Access and Use Policy Link to Full Screen Map The Map | The Dots | Weird Colors? | Rural Areas | Dots Located in Parks and Lakes? | Data Sources | Methodology Download a High Resolution Image of the U.S. Racial Dot Map (33 MB) Please read the Access and Use Policy, which describes how this map can be used and how it should be cited. NEW: You can see the new Congressional Dot Map project with election results here. The Map This map is an American snapshot; it provides an accessible visualization of geographic distribution, population density, and racial diversity of the American people in every neighborhood in the entire country. The map displays 308,745,538 dots, one for each person residing in the United States at the location they were counted during the 2010 Census. Each dot is color-coded by the individual’s race and ethnicity. The map is presented in both [...]

NEWS via CNN: 7 Things you Probably Didn’t know about Maps

February 9, 2014 // 0 Comments

7 things you probably didn’t know about maps By Frances Cha, CNN February 3, 2014 — Updated 1011 GMT (1811 HKT) London-based map dealer Daniel Crouch shares a few unusual or rare maps from a recent exhibition in Hong Kong. According to Crouch, maps of BRIC nations (Brazil, Russia, India and China) are rising in popularity among map collectors. This 17th-century map of China is a double-page hand-colored engraved map published in 1665 by John Speed. STORY HIGHLIGHTS “Paper towns” were fake places added to maps by mapmakers in order to dupe forgers into copying them The world’s best map collection is in Paris, says map dealer Daniel Crouch Maps of BRIC nations are popular in the collecting world right now (CNN) — Maps can be beautiful and good ones can be great investments. But what collectors often find most entrancing about maps are how they provide portals into history. The rise and fall of cities, the charting of war and adventure, the promise [...]

NEWS vía GlobalPost: Latin America: The Cost of Murder

January 18, 2014 // 0 Comments

The effects that crime, violence, and the homicide rate have on Latin America is a model for the rest of the world. The loss of GDP due to a loss of a work force is starting to have an effect on countries in the form of a lost TAX BASE which can lead to decaying INFRASTRUCTURE and social programs. A increasing adult MORTALITY RATE leaves orphans without families and ultimately guidance for their futures. Coupled with political corruption, there is little hope for the trend to change any time soon. -The Human Imprint  ▇ ▅ █ ▅ ▇ ▂ ▃ ▁ ▁ ▅ ▃ ▅ ▅ ▄ ▅ ▇ ▇ ▅ █ ▅ ▇ ▂ ▃ ▁ ▁ ▅ ▃ ▅ ▅ ▄ ▅ ▇ ▇ ▅ █ ▅ ▇ ▂ ▃ ▁ Latin America: The cost of murder Simeon Tegel, January 18, 2014 06:01 Editor’s note: Warning — this article contains graphic images. LIMA, Peru — Dreams of a better life randomly shattered forever by a stranger’s bullet. Homeless orphans sucked into violent crime. Entire neighborhoods where the [...]

NEWS via NPR: The Katydid Dilemma: Will You Eat Insects?

January 17, 2014 // 0 Comments

Could this be the onset of the Fourth AGRICULTURAL REVOLUTION? One thing is for sure, it would have made ESTER BOSERUP smile. -Human Imprint ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Reblog via NPR The Katydid Dilemma: Will You Eat Insects? by BARBARA J. KING January 17, 201411:13 AM It’s right there on the dinner menu at Oyamel (a Washington, D.C., restaurant), listed under the “authentic Mexican tacos” section: Chapulines The legendary Oaxacan specialty of sauteed grasshoppers, shallots, tequila and guacamole. $5.00 Whether it’s sauteed grasshoppers at Oyamel or katydid grilled cheese sandwiches prepared for the annual Bug Fair at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles, insects are the new darlings of the avant-garde food world. At least that’s the message in the chapter called “Grub” from Dana Goodyear’s book Anything that Moves: Renegade Chefs, Fearless Eaters, and the Making of a New American Food Culture. Which animals we [...]

LESSON PLAN: Environmental Determinism, Ellsworth Huntington, and the Decline of Geography | GeoCurrents

October 3, 2013 // 0 Comments

Environmental Determinism, Ellsworth Huntington, and the Decline of Geography | GeoCurrents. Geography is defined as “the study of the earth and its features.” Derived from the Greek for “earth writings,” geography traditionally focused on the world as a whole; investigations of smaller regions were a distinct if related branch of learning. For centuries, the main focus of geographical research was filling in the unknown portions of the world map. But as that task came to an end in the late 1800s and early 1900s, new research frontiers were sought. Many geographers turned to what was then a hot topic in social science: the racial differentiation of humankind. Others attempted to distill geographical laws from the age-old theory of environmental determinism, seeking global correlations among climate, soils, and landforms, on the one hand, and social, political, and cultural forms, on the other. By the 1910s and ‘20s, environmental determinism was the reigning paradigm of [...]
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