health care

NEWS via psMag: Ironic Gentrification and the Migration of Globalization

March 24, 2014 // 0 Comments

Ironic Gentrification and the Migration of Globalization BY JIM RUSSELL • March 20, 2014 • 2:00 AM Cherry blossom trees in Buffalo, New York, in bloom. (Photo DragonFire1024/Wikimedia Commons) Higher education and health care, two major elements of the new Legacy Economy, are attracting global talent and gentrifying the neighborhoods that surround them, pricing out residents who toil in the local or regional labor market. I link economic globalization to gentrification with migration. Gentrification itself is an indicator of intensifying globalization. The influx of migrants who toil in a global labor market move into a neighborhood and compete with residents who toil in a local or regional labor market. Soon enough, the rent is too damn high. Or, if you like (I do), the wages are too damn low. Both cost for shelter and income impact housing affordability. A conventional measure that captures both variables is percentage of income dedicated to housing. In that light, some [...]

NEWS via NPR: Who Had Richer Parents, Doctors Or Artists

March 18, 2014 // 0 Comments

Who Had Richer Parents, Doctors Or Artists A few weeks ago, we were sitting around the office arguing over this simple question: Who had richer parents, journalists or people working in finance? Doctors or artists? More generally: What’s the link between household income during childhood and job choice during adulthood? After some poking around, we figured out how to settle the argument. A government survey has tracked more than 12,000 people for decades. It allowed us to look at the same group of people in 1979 and 2010 — from a time when most were teenagers to the time when they were middle-aged and, for the most part, gainfully employed. We crunched the data a few ways. First, here’s a table that answers our basic question. It links peoples’ jobs as adults in 2010 to their parents’ income when they were kids in 1979. Job As Adult Household Income During Childhood Farming, Fishing, And Forestry less than $35,000 Child Care Workers, Home Care Workers, etc. [...]

NEWS via SBS.com: Why geography is Australia’s biggest silent killer

March 16, 2014 // 0 Comments

Why geography is Australia’s biggest silent killer Understanding how the characteristics of a particular place impact health is critically important if we are to understand how to improve health and longevity in rural and remote Australia. By Lesley Barclay, University of Sydney Many people think the poorer health and lower life expectancy of people living in rural or remote Australia are attributable to the under-supply of health services in those areas. But this is only one contributing factor. Far more important is the distribution of health risk factors and how they interact with the nature of rural and remote places, which results in people dying younger. Data from the National Health Performance Authority shows life expectancy at birth ranges from 83.6 years in metro areas to 81.5 in regional hubs and 78.2 in rural places. The picture is even grimmer when we look at avoidable deaths. From a population of 100,000, there are 115 avoidable deaths in metro areas compared to [...]

NEWS via Newsweek: The Geography of Autism

March 15, 2014 // 0 Comments

The Geography of Autism By Rob Verger Filed: 3/14/14 at 2:56 PM  | Updated: 3/14/14 at 4:09 PM A new study hints at why autism clusters, but experts caution seeking an easy solutionEnrique De La Osa/Reuters Filed Under: Tech & Science, autism, Science, Studie Researchers have long know that autism is found in clusters. Certain communities and states have rates much higher than the rest of the country — a child born in California is several times more likely to be diagnosed with autism than a child in Alabama, for example. But the question why remains unanswered. The geographical nature of the disorder seems to imply some sort of local, environmental cause. And a new study suggests just that: it found a strong correlation between autism rates and male reproductive system malformations, which can be caused by environmental toxins. There is a complex array of factors that can influence autism rates, though: they seem to be affected by issues as diverse as income level, [...]

NEWS via Pew Research Center: As the population grays, Americans stay upbeat

February 15, 2014 // 1 Comment

As the population grays, Americans stay upbeat BY RAKESH KOCHHARLEAVE A COMMENT One-in-five Americans are expected to be 65 and older by mid-century, and this could be a problem for the country. There is worry that government and household finances may be pushed to the brink by rising pension and health care expenditures. Economic growth, we are warned, might suffer with fewer workers and more retirees. But what does the public think? It may come as a surprise that the American public is pretty optimistic. In a Pew Research Center survey, only about one-in-four Americans say the growing number of older people is a major problem for the country, nearly two-thirds are confident they will have an adequate standard of living in their old age, and almost one-half say that individuals are primarily responsible for their own economic well-being as they get older. These opinions differ sharply from public opinion in most of the 20 other countries that we surveyed. Americans are among the [...]
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