history

VIDEO via FreeBase: Charting Culture by Mapping Migration

August 14, 2014 // 0 Comments

Video: Thousands of Years of Human Migration in Five Minutes By Lisa Raffensperger | July 31, 2014 2:00 pm   It’s enough to put an old-fashioned family tree to shame. A visualization of the migration routes of more than 150,000 people, from 600 BC to the present day, brings to life human history in the Western world in an engrossing and novel way. The model, produced by Maximilian Schich, at the University of Texas at Dallas, along with collaborators from the U.S., Switzerland and Hungary, represents the birth and death dates and locations of individual people. These data came from community database Freebase, a well-known German encyclopedia of the world’s artists, and Getty’s online artist names database. The sample included such notable individuals as David, King of Israel, and Leonardo da Vinci, but, since Freebase is editable by anyone, it also included average folk. “You will have people where we know that there was a carpenter in Nuremberg, who lived from 1530 to [...]

NEWS via NPR: Map Of Native American Tribes You’ve Never Seen Before

June 26, 2014 // 0 Comments

http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2014/06/24/323665644/the-map-of-native-american-tribes-youve-never-seen-before The Map Of Native American Tribes You’ve Never Seen Before by HANSI LO WANG June 24, 2014 4:03 PM ET  Listen to the Story All Things Considered 3 min 36 sec Playlist Download Transcript Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has designed a map of Native American tribes showing their locations before first contact with Europeans. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR Finding an address on a map can be taken for granted in the age of GPS and smartphones. But centuries of forced relocation, disease and genocide have made it difficult to find where many Native American tribes once lived. Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has pinpointed the locations and original names of hundreds of American Indian nations before their first contact with Europeans. As a teenager, Carapella says he could never get his hands on a continental U.S. map like [...]

NEWS via Christian Science Monitor: Why African-Americans are moving back to the South

March 16, 2014 // 0 Comments

After decades of moving north, thousands of blacks are returning to their Southern roots for economic and cultural reasons. By Carmen K. Sisson, Correspondent / March 16, 2014 Artist Kia Darceo left Milwaukee for Atlanta, which she calls ‘Black Mecca.’ This is the cover story in the Mar. 17 issue of The Christian Science MonitorWeekly. Melanie Stetson Freeman/Staff WEST POINT, MISS. When Charlie Cox told his friends he was leaving Chicago, no one tried to talk him out of it. After 35 years at General Motors, he was ready to retire. Ready to trade the cold and the crime and the frenetic pace of life for the rivers and fields of his youth. He had grown up in rural West Point, Miss., and he had moved north with his family when he was 9 years old, but somehow his heart had never quite followed. His spirit yearned for the South, and, as the years passed, the memories of his childhood burned brighter until he couldn’t stand it any longer. There was only one problem: [...]

NEWS via NGS: Genghis Khan’s Secret Weapon Was Rain

March 14, 2014 // 0 Comments

Tree-ring studies suggest that a long wet spell gave him the resources to invade and conquer. Some 800 years ago, ancestors of modern Mongolians conquered the world on horseback. A period of unusually mild weather may have helped propel them by making them rich in livestock. Roff Smith National Geographic PUBLISHED MARCH 10, 2014 For unsuspecting herdsmen in the 13th century, April showers didn’t bring May flowers—they brought Mongol hordes. New research by tree-ring scientists from Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and West Virginia University may have uncovered the reason why an obscure band of nomadic Mongol horsemen were able to sweep through much of Asia in a few meteoric decades 800 years ago, conquering everything in their path: They enjoyed an unprecedented, and yet-to-be-repeated, 15-year run of bountiful rains and mild weather on the normally cold and arid steppes. By sampling tree rings in the gnarled and twisted Siberian pines in the [...]

NEWS via HeritageDaily: 17th- and 18th-century risk of disease through Migration

March 5, 2014 // 0 Comments

17th- and 18th-century risk of disease through Migration HERITAGE March 3, 2014 – No comments The fate of migrants moving to cities in 17th- and 18th-century England demonstrates how a single pathogen could dramatically alter the risks associated with migration and migratory patterns today. Cities have always been a magnet to migrants. In 2010, a tipping point was reached for the first time when, according to the World Health Organization, the majority of the world’s population lived in cities. By 2050, seven out of 10 people will have been born in – or migrated to – a city. One hundred years ago, that figure was two out of 10. Today, cities are generally the safest places to live. If you live in one, you’re likely to be richer than someone living in a rural environment. If you’re richer, you’re likely to live longer. If you live in a city, you have better access to hospitals and healthcare, and you’re more likely to be immunised. But that was not always the [...]

NEWS via National Geographic: Behind the Headlines: History and Geography Help Explain Ukraine Crisis

February 28, 2014 // 1 Comment

Behind the Headlines: History and Geography Help Explain Ukraine Crisis The country rests precariously between East and West. A woman wipes away tears as she walks away from a memorial in Independence Square in Kiev, Ukraine. PHOTOGRAPH BY DARKO BANDIC, AP Eve Conant for National Geographic PUBLISHED FEBRUARY 24, 2014 Charged with the mass killings of civilians, Ukraine’s recently ousted president, Viktor Yanukovych, is now on the lam. Last November Yanukovych touched off months of deadly protests in the capital of Kiev and other cities by caving into pressure from the country’s former overlords in Moscow and shelving a landmark trade deal with the European Union. Dozens of citizens died last week in clashes with police and security forces in Kiev. On Saturday evening, the Ukrainian parliament voted to remove Yanukovych from his post as president. The new government has now issued a warrant for the president’s arrest, but his exact whereabouts are unknown. [...]
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