housing

VIDEO: Voices of Cabrini

April 21, 2015 // 0 Comments

Voices of Cabrini: Remaking Chicago’s Public Housing Voices of Cabrini: Remaking Chicago’s Public Housing, follows families and a small business owner as they are moved out of Chicago’s most “notorious” and iconic housing project, Cabrini [...]

NEWS via psMag: Ironic Gentrification and the Migration of Globalization

March 24, 2014 // 0 Comments

Ironic Gentrification and the Migration of Globalization BY JIM RUSSELL • March 20, 2014 • 2:00 AM Cherry blossom trees in Buffalo, New York, in bloom. (Photo DragonFire1024/Wikimedia Commons) Higher education and health care, two major elements of the new Legacy Economy, are attracting global talent and gentrifying the neighborhoods that surround them, pricing out residents who toil in the local or regional labor market. I link economic globalization to gentrification with migration. Gentrification itself is an indicator of intensifying globalization. The influx of migrants who toil in a global labor market move into a neighborhood and compete with residents who toil in a local or regional labor market. Soon enough, the rent is too damn high. Or, if you like (I do), the wages are too damn low. Both cost for shelter and income impact housing affordability. A conventional measure that captures both variables is percentage of income dedicated to housing. In that light, some [...]

NEWS via TheAtlanticCities.com: America’s 1,000 Richest Neighborhoods

March 23, 2014 // 0 Comments

America’s 1,000 Richest Neighborhoods RICHARD FLORIDA MAR 13, 2014 Carolyn Williams/Flickr America’s “one percent” are a privileged bunch. It takes an adjusted gross income of almost $400,000 to be counted among those who make up the country’s top earners. Together, the top 1 percent account for nearly 20 percent of reported taxable income in the U.S. Overall, the one percent are heavily concentrated along the East and West Coasts. And despite all the talk about gentrification and the movement of the uber-affluent back to the cities, their numbers are overwhelmingly concentrated in the upscale suburbs of America’s increasingly bicoastal economy – places like Greenwich, Connecticut; Bethesda and Potomac, Maryland; Coral Gables, Florida; and Newport Beach, California. Eighteen neighborhoods have average incomes of more than $500,000. These are the location patterns of America’s super rich that geographer Stephen Higley has documented in a new [...]

NEWS via CNN Money: 11 cities where workers are disappearing

March 14, 2014 // 0 Comments

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) Cincinnati, Cleveland and Dayton, Ohio The labor force has been shrinking in all of Ohio’s major cities other than its state capital, Columbus. Cleveland has lost 52,000 workers, or about 5% of its labor force, since November 2007, and Cincinnati lost 39,000 workers, or about 4% of its labor force, since May 2009, according to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data. Job growth is anemic, particularly in Ohio’s main industry, manufacturing. Signs point to workers giving up, said Amy Hanauer, executive director of Policy Matters Ohio. “I think people are getting discouraged and leaving the labor market,” she said. Ohio lost 388,000 jobs in the financial crisis, and has since gained only about a fifth of them back. Phoenix and Tucson, Ariz. The fallout from the housing bust is still felt here. The construction sector slashed more than half its jobs in the crisis, and they’ve only started to trickle back in the last few months. But the [...]

NEWS via Times-Picayune: Shotgun geography: the history behind the famous New Orleans elongated house

February 14, 2014 // 0 Comments

Shotgun geography: the history behind the famous New Orleans elongated house Few elements of the New Orleans cityscape speak to the intersection of architecture, sociology and geography so well as the shotgun house. Once scorned, now cherished, shotguns shed light on patterns of cultural diffusion, class and residential settlement, social preferences and construction methods. Photo by Doug Parker/ The Times-Picayune archive NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune Few elements of the New Orleans cityscape speak to the intersection of architecture, sociology and geography so well as the shotgun house. Once scorned, now cherished, shotguns shed light on patterns of cultural diffusion, class and residential settlement, social preferences and construction methods.   The shotgun house is not an architectural style; rather, it is a structural typology — what folklorist John Michael Vlach described as “a philosophy of space, a culturally determined sense of dimension.” A [...]
Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On Pinterest