mortality rate

NEWS via WHO: Air pollution caused one in eight deaths

March 26, 2014 // 0 Comments

WHO: Air pollution caused one in eight deaths By Arshiya Khullar, for CNN March 25, 2014 — Updated 1417 GMT (2217 HKT) Poor women and children who spend time at home are exposed to indoor air pollution. STORY HIGHLIGHTS WHO describes air pollution as single largest environmental health risk Asian countries hardest hit by outdoor and indoor air pollution Majority of 7 million deaths linked with pollution are heart disease, stroke, lung diseases (CNN) — An estimated 7 million people died due to air pollution globally in 2012, with more than half of the deaths linked to indoor smoke from cook stoves, according to a report by the World Health Organization. Air pollution is now the “single largest environmental health risk,” the U.N. health agency stated in the report. The majority of the deaths associated with air pollution were heart disease, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. “Few risks have greater impact on global health [...]

NEWS via SBS.com: Why geography is Australia’s biggest silent killer

March 16, 2014 // 0 Comments

Why geography is Australia’s biggest silent killer Understanding how the characteristics of a particular place impact health is critically important if we are to understand how to improve health and longevity in rural and remote Australia. By Lesley Barclay, University of Sydney Many people think the poorer health and lower life expectancy of people living in rural or remote Australia are attributable to the under-supply of health services in those areas. But this is only one contributing factor. Far more important is the distribution of health risk factors and how they interact with the nature of rural and remote places, which results in people dying younger. Data from the National Health Performance Authority shows life expectancy at birth ranges from 83.6 years in metro areas to 81.5 in regional hubs and 78.2 in rural places. The picture is even grimmer when we look at avoidable deaths. From a population of 100,000, there are 115 avoidable deaths in metro areas compared to [...]

NEWS via HeritageDaily: 17th- and 18th-century risk of disease through Migration

March 5, 2014 // 0 Comments

17th- and 18th-century risk of disease through Migration HERITAGE March 3, 2014 – No comments The fate of migrants moving to cities in 17th- and 18th-century England demonstrates how a single pathogen could dramatically alter the risks associated with migration and migratory patterns today. Cities have always been a magnet to migrants. In 2010, a tipping point was reached for the first time when, according to the World Health Organization, the majority of the world’s population lived in cities. By 2050, seven out of 10 people will have been born in – or migrated to – a city. One hundred years ago, that figure was two out of 10. Today, cities are generally the safest places to live. If you live in one, you’re likely to be richer than someone living in a rural environment. If you’re richer, you’re likely to live longer. If you live in a city, you have better access to hospitals and healthcare, and you’re more likely to be immunised. But that was not always the [...]
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