national geographic

VIDEO via NGS: Food by the Numbers: Feeding Our Hungry Planet

October 16, 2014 // 0 Comments

By 2050, the world’s population will likely increase 35 percent. But is growing more food the only option—or even the best? National Geographic investigates the challenges and solutions to feeding everyone on our planet, based on an eight-month series in National Geographic magazine. Visit natgeofood.com for ongoing coverage of food [...]

ARTICLE via NGS: The Pyres of Varanasi: Breaking the Cycle of Death and Rebirth

August 14, 2014 // 0 Comments

The Pyres of Varanasi: Breaking the Cycle of Death and Rebirth One river, 18,000 feet, 1,500 miles. In the fall of 2013, photographer and videographer Pete McBride, along with professional climbers Jake Norton and Dave Morton, followed the Ganges River from snow to sea. All this week, Proof takes you on their 45-day journey—by foot, boat, bike, aircraft, rickshaw, bus, train, and even elephant—as they track every mile of this sacred river. October 7-12, 2013 When you step off a wooden boat onto the banks of the burning ghat in the oldest of India’s cities and you weave through a maze of funeral pyres hissing, steaming, and spitting orange embers into an inky night and you feel the metronome clang of bells vibrating inside your chest and a wave of furnace-like heat consuming everything in its reach, you realize how removed you truly are from the ritual of death. The burning ghat in Varanasi, India’s oldest city, glows as burning pyres continue through the night. Launch Gallery [...]

NEWS via Mashable: Mapmakers Debate How to Define Crimea

March 21, 2014 // 0 Comments

Mapmakers Debate How to Define Crimea A cartographer at work, circa 1930.IMAGE: VINTAGE IMAGES/HULTON ARCHIVE/GETTY IMAGES BY COLIN DAILEDA1 DAY AGO Much of the world is watching how the high-stakes tug-of-war over Crimea will play out, but few groups of professionals are more invested than cartographers. Cartographers are tasked with mapping the political dimensions of the globe. That means when a piece of land switches ownership between countries, it’s their job to decide whether they want to make that change official. The latest debate for this small but influential club is centered on Crimea, the once-autonomous region of Ukraine that voted on March 16 to become a part of Russia. Russian President Vladimir Putin has signed a treaty to annex the peninsula, and it now must be approved by the Russian parliament. On Wednesday, the Ukrainian governmentannounced it was pulling out its troops. But Western nations including the United States, the U.K., and Germany, have not [...]

NEWS via National Geographic: Behind the Headlines: History and Geography Help Explain Ukraine Crisis

February 28, 2014 // 1 Comment

Behind the Headlines: History and Geography Help Explain Ukraine Crisis The country rests precariously between East and West. A woman wipes away tears as she walks away from a memorial in Independence Square in Kiev, Ukraine. PHOTOGRAPH BY DARKO BANDIC, AP Eve Conant for National Geographic PUBLISHED FEBRUARY 24, 2014 Charged with the mass killings of civilians, Ukraine’s recently ousted president, Viktor Yanukovych, is now on the lam. Last November Yanukovych touched off months of deadly protests in the capital of Kiev and other cities by caving into pressure from the country’s former overlords in Moscow and shelving a landmark trade deal with the European Union. Dozens of citizens died last week in clashes with police and security forces in Kiev. On Saturday evening, the Ukrainian parliament voted to remove Yanukovych from his post as president. The new government has now issued a warrant for the president’s arrest, but his exact whereabouts are unknown. [...]

NEWS via Nat’l Geographic: The Growth of Megacities

February 19, 2014 // 0 Comments

Geography in the News: The Growth of Megacities Posted by Neal Lineback of Geography in the NewsTM on February 17, 2014 By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner,  Geography in the NewsTM Megacities’ Expansive Growth For the first time in human history, more of the world’s 6.8 billion people live in cities than in rural areas. That is an incredible demographic and geographic shift since 1950 when only 30 percent of the world’s 2.5 billion inhabitants lived in urban environments. The world’s largest cities, particularly in developing countries, are growing at phenomenal rates. As a growing landless class is attracted by urban opportunities, meager as they might be, these cities’ populations are ballooning to incredible numbers. A May 2010 Christian Science Monitor article on “megacities” predicted that by 2050, almost 70 percent of the world’s estimated 10 billion people—more than the number of people living today—will reside in urban areas. The social, [...]
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