pattern

Illustrated Textbook: Location’s Three Types of Distribution

August 14, 2017 // 0 Comments

We continue to discuss spatial distribution with our example of traffic fatalities in the state of Wyoming. This page deals with critical fundamentals-SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION, and it’s three types: PATTERN, DENSITY, and CONCENTRATION. We also talk about what it means to be CLUSTERED and DISPERSED, and the differences between LINEAR PATTERN, CENTRALIZED PATTERN, and RANDOM PATTERN (the oxymoron). Click to [...]

Lessons and Worksheets: Spacial Distribution: Pattern, Concentration, Density

June 25, 2014 // 0 Comments

Teacher’s Notes: This is the lesson that I use for my students to teach them about the concept of spatial distribution and density. I am sure that you can implement a few more fun things like using M&Ms to have them illustrate the different types as well (actually I might try that this year). The blank worksheet and key are below. It usually takes my kids  50 minutes to complete the worksheet and it takes me 20 minutes to complete the lecture. Title: Spacial Distribution: The Final Frontier Topics: Space: Pattern, Distribution, Concentration, Density Time: 50-70 minutes Materials: Lecture Notes, Worksheets Purpose: For students to understand the different types of spatial distributions and types of densities. Procedure: 1) Lecture/Discussion: Explain to students what SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION is and its importance. Provide students with lecture notes on how to figure out the three types of arithmetic density. Explain why it is useful for geographers to [...]

NEWS via TheAtlanticCities.com: America’s 1,000 Richest Neighborhoods

March 23, 2014 // 0 Comments

America’s 1,000 Richest Neighborhoods RICHARD FLORIDA MAR 13, 2014 Carolyn Williams/Flickr America’s “one percent” are a privileged bunch. It takes an adjusted gross income of almost $400,000 to be counted among those who make up the country’s top earners. Together, the top 1 percent account for nearly 20 percent of reported taxable income in the U.S. Overall, the one percent are heavily concentrated along the East and West Coasts. And despite all the talk about gentrification and the movement of the uber-affluent back to the cities, their numbers are overwhelmingly concentrated in the upscale suburbs of America’s increasingly bicoastal economy – places like Greenwich, Connecticut; Bethesda and Potomac, Maryland; Coral Gables, Florida; and Newport Beach, California. Eighteen neighborhoods have average incomes of more than $500,000. These are the location patterns of America’s super rich that geographer Stephen Higley has documented in a new [...]

NEWS via FCW.com: Why Maps Matter

March 20, 2014 // 0 Comments

Why maps matter By Frank Konkel Mar 17, 2014 People used to use maps so they wouldn’t get lost. But in recent years, access to the Global Positioning System and the proliferation of mobile technology have made paper-based maps almost irrelevant. Unless you’re in uncharted territory, it’s hard to get lost anymore. Basic geography is as easy as inputting an address and letting your mobile phone tell you how to get there. And as mapping technology advances, it allows for far more than foolproof directions. Federal agencies now use geospatial data, geo-analytics and multi-layered maps for myriad purposes, including gathering intelligence, predicting disease outbreaks and sharing data pools with the public. The allure of mapping lies in its intuitiveness. Even simple “dots on a map can be a powerful way to see trends in data,” said Josh Campbell, geographic information system architect for the Humanitarian Information Unit at the State Department. “Maps [...]

LESSON PLAN: Geomedicine

June 10, 2013 // 0 Comments

Topics: Geomedicine, Health, Activity Space, Environmental Geography, GIS, Pattern Source: AP Reading Technology Integration Night; Presenter Materials: iPad, iTouch, or iPhone Apps Required: TED, Place History Procedure: 1) Have students watch TED Talk titled, Bill Devenhall: Your Health Depends on Where you Live (9:25) 2) Q&A/Discussion/Lecture about how geography can help determine health risks. Discuss how the EPA and GIS can team up to assist in these discoveries. 3) Have students open Place History and find their current location and what toxic release locations are nearby.  Using the legend they can also determine the risk of heart attack Above and Beyond: Students can hit the “Explore” button and enter the various locations of places in which the frequent on a daily basis or have previously lived.  Students have the option of allowing the location tracking on their devices, which is why this should be an optional [...]
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