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VIDEO: Where are the World’s Worst Slums?

April 21, 2016 // 0 Comments

This short 2:46 second vide clip presented by TestTube News describes how the United Nations categorizes an urban slum and also where are the most populated urban slums in the world. It is a great introduction to problems within the LDC city and the topic of [...]

NEWS: The Country Training People to Leave

March 9, 2015 // 0 Comments

A great article to discuss when teaching BRAINDRAIN. The country training people to leave By Stephen SackurBBC, Philippines The Philippines has one of the fastest growing economies in Asia – but there aren’t enough jobs to go around. So every year the government teaches thousands of people the skills they need to get jobs abroad. When I arrive at the state-run Housemaids Academy in Manila morning exercises are well under way. A squad of uniformed cleaners is poking feather dusters into all corners of the sitting room. In the kitchen trainee cooks are immersed in the finer points of salad preparation. The academy has the feel of a soap-opera set – each room meticulously dressed to ape the reality of a grand residence. Below stairs is a classroom filled with old fashioned school desks. Here, I’m told, the trainee house servants take lessons in hygiene, respect and personal finance. The Philippines government schools tens of thousands of maids, chauffeurs, [...]

VIDEO via FreeBase: Charting Culture by Mapping Migration

August 14, 2014 // 0 Comments

Video: Thousands of Years of Human Migration in Five Minutes By Lisa Raffensperger | July 31, 2014 2:00 pm   It’s enough to put an old-fashioned family tree to shame. A visualization of the migration routes of more than 150,000 people, from 600 BC to the present day, brings to life human history in the Western world in an engrossing and novel way. The model, produced by Maximilian Schich, at the University of Texas at Dallas, along with collaborators from the U.S., Switzerland and Hungary, represents the birth and death dates and locations of individual people. These data came from community database Freebase, a well-known German encyclopedia of the world’s artists, and Getty’s online artist names database. The sample included such notable individuals as David, King of Israel, and Leonardo da Vinci, but, since Freebase is editable by anyone, it also included average folk. “You will have people where we know that there was a carpenter in Nuremberg, who lived from 1530 to [...]

Observations from the 2014 AP Human Geography Reading

June 11, 2014 // 4 Comments

Once again the AP Human Geography reading was a success. I still firmly believe that this group pf 500+ teachers and professors have GOT to be the most extraordinary and interesting people than any other group of readers. The stories that we all overhear while riding up the escalator for lunch are unbelievable and  inspires me to keep pushing to be a better teacher than I was yesterday. Never mind the 1125 free response questions that I graded- this is by far the best professional development that I can ever get. I am very thankful for a productive professional development night, and all of the other “professional development” nights outside of the convention center. After pondering the rubric that we used for grading and discussing it with my table, I decided to do some further research into the previous years and see what types of verbs that the FRQ test requests the students to answer. Some of my findings were interesting and provoked more thought while others were [...]

NEWS via TheAtlanticCities.com: America’s 1,000 Richest Neighborhoods

March 23, 2014 // 0 Comments

America’s 1,000 Richest Neighborhoods RICHARD FLORIDA MAR 13, 2014 Carolyn Williams/Flickr America’s “one percent” are a privileged bunch. It takes an adjusted gross income of almost $400,000 to be counted among those who make up the country’s top earners. Together, the top 1 percent account for nearly 20 percent of reported taxable income in the U.S. Overall, the one percent are heavily concentrated along the East and West Coasts. And despite all the talk about gentrification and the movement of the uber-affluent back to the cities, their numbers are overwhelmingly concentrated in the upscale suburbs of America’s increasingly bicoastal economy – places like Greenwich, Connecticut; Bethesda and Potomac, Maryland; Coral Gables, Florida; and Newport Beach, California. Eighteen neighborhoods have average incomes of more than $500,000. These are the location patterns of America’s super rich that geographer Stephen Higley has documented in a new [...]

VIDEO via Frontline: India-The Missing Girls

March 21, 2014 // 0 Comments

Frontline Roughtcut Website In 2006, when my wife and I traveled to India to live and work, the one issue that kept grabbing our attention was northern India’s deep cultural preference for sons over daughters. The desire for sons can be so great, that some families, after having a girl or two, will abort female fetuses until they bear a son. The practice is called female feticide or sex selection. In some ways this is a very old tale. Long before medical abortion became available, unwanted girls were killed after birth or not given enough food and medicine to survive. But modern technology has changed that. Ultrasound machines, which make it possible to determine the gender of a fetus, have spread from big city hospitals to small country clinics. Portable machines are taken to remote villages by motorcycle. As a consequence, infanticide has given way to feticide. Despite a law banning sex selective abortion in force for a decade, as many as half a million female fetuses are [...]

NEWS via Christian Science Monitor: Why African-Americans are moving back to the South

March 16, 2014 // 0 Comments

After decades of moving north, thousands of blacks are returning to their Southern roots for economic and cultural reasons. By Carmen K. Sisson, Correspondent / March 16, 2014 Artist Kia Darceo left Milwaukee for Atlanta, which she calls ‘Black Mecca.’ This is the cover story in the Mar. 17 issue of The Christian Science MonitorWeekly. Melanie Stetson Freeman/Staff WEST POINT, MISS. When Charlie Cox told his friends he was leaving Chicago, no one tried to talk him out of it. After 35 years at General Motors, he was ready to retire. Ready to trade the cold and the crime and the frenetic pace of life for the rivers and fields of his youth. He had grown up in rural West Point, Miss., and he had moved north with his family when he was 9 years old, but somehow his heart had never quite followed. His spirit yearned for the South, and, as the years passed, the memories of his childhood burned brighter until he couldn’t stand it any longer. There was only one problem: [...]

NEWS via Newsweek: The Geography of Autism

March 15, 2014 // 0 Comments

The Geography of Autism By Rob Verger Filed: 3/14/14 at 2:56 PM  | Updated: 3/14/14 at 4:09 PM A new study hints at why autism clusters, but experts caution seeking an easy solutionEnrique De La Osa/Reuters Filed Under: Tech & Science, autism, Science, Studie Researchers have long know that autism is found in clusters. Certain communities and states have rates much higher than the rest of the country — a child born in California is several times more likely to be diagnosed with autism than a child in Alabama, for example. But the question why remains unanswered. The geographical nature of the disorder seems to imply some sort of local, environmental cause. And a new study suggests just that: it found a strong correlation between autism rates and male reproductive system malformations, which can be caused by environmental toxins. There is a complex array of factors that can influence autism rates, though: they seem to be affected by issues as diverse as income level, [...]

NEWS via CNN Money: 11 cities where workers are disappearing

March 14, 2014 // 0 Comments

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) Cincinnati, Cleveland and Dayton, Ohio The labor force has been shrinking in all of Ohio’s major cities other than its state capital, Columbus. Cleveland has lost 52,000 workers, or about 5% of its labor force, since November 2007, and Cincinnati lost 39,000 workers, or about 4% of its labor force, since May 2009, according to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data. Job growth is anemic, particularly in Ohio’s main industry, manufacturing. Signs point to workers giving up, said Amy Hanauer, executive director of Policy Matters Ohio. “I think people are getting discouraged and leaving the labor market,” she said. Ohio lost 388,000 jobs in the financial crisis, and has since gained only about a fifth of them back. Phoenix and Tucson, Ariz. The fallout from the housing bust is still felt here. The construction sector slashed more than half its jobs in the crisis, and they’ve only started to trickle back in the last few months. But the [...]

INTERACTIVE: Pop Vs. Soda Interactive Survey

June 14, 2013 // 0 Comments

This interactive website created by PhD candidate, Alan McConchie allows for you to participate in an ongoing mapping project to see where people are saying “pop”, “soda”, and “coke.”  Enter your data to be included in the [...]
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