transit

INTERACTIVE: Map Projection- Google and Jason Davies

August 19, 2014 // 0 Comments

Thanks to the Vsauce video, What Does the Earth Look Like,  we can use a few other helpful sites to interact with map projection. The first one is Google’s Mercator Map Puzzle where it gives you red country pieces that have distorted sizes and shapes. The player must drag the shapes around to find out what they “correctly” look like on a mercator map. The second interactive is Jason Davies’ interactive map projection website that allows the user to select a different map projection from a drop down and see how it effects the different shapes of the continents. Look for a worksheet that uses this website later. This one is [...]

NEWS via TheAtlanticCities.com: America’s 1,000 Richest Neighborhoods

March 23, 2014 // 0 Comments

America’s 1,000 Richest Neighborhoods RICHARD FLORIDA MAR 13, 2014 Carolyn Williams/Flickr America’s “one percent” are a privileged bunch. It takes an adjusted gross income of almost $400,000 to be counted among those who make up the country’s top earners. Together, the top 1 percent account for nearly 20 percent of reported taxable income in the U.S. Overall, the one percent are heavily concentrated along the East and West Coasts. And despite all the talk about gentrification and the movement of the uber-affluent back to the cities, their numbers are overwhelmingly concentrated in the upscale suburbs of America’s increasingly bicoastal economy – places like Greenwich, Connecticut; Bethesda and Potomac, Maryland; Coral Gables, Florida; and Newport Beach, California. Eighteen neighborhoods have average incomes of more than $500,000. These are the location patterns of America’s super rich that geographer Stephen Higley has documented in a new [...]

RESOURCE via Metropolis Mag: These Maps Show How Subway Maps Twist Urban Reality

February 8, 2014 // 0 Comments

These Maps Show How Subway Maps Twist Urban Reality Komal Sharma A new project by historian Benjamin M. Schmidt reveals how wrong subway maps really are. Courtesy Benjamin M. Schmidt It’s not a secret that our subway maps distort the geographies of the metropoles they claim to represent. When we traverse a city everyday with an MTA (Metropolitan Transportation Authority NY) or WMATA map (Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority), our conception of the city—its boundaries, expanses—easily becomes scrambled. For instance, both Washington’s dense inner core and its spread-out outskirts are all shown on the same scale. In a grid city like Manhattan there might be some semblance of similarity, but in most other cities, reality on the ground is completely different. A new project developed at Northeastern University tackles these problems head on. Benjamin M. Schmidt, a professor of history, has designed interactive digital maps of Boston, New York and Washington that [...]
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