urban

VIDEO: Where are the World’s Worst Slums?

April 21, 2016 // 0 Comments

This short 2:46 second vide clip presented by TestTube News describes how the United Nations categorizes an urban slum and also where are the most populated urban slums in the world. It is a great introduction to problems within the LDC city and the topic of [...]

VIDEO: Voices of Cabrini

April 21, 2015 // 0 Comments

Voices of Cabrini: Remaking Chicago’s Public Housing Voices of Cabrini: Remaking Chicago’s Public Housing, follows families and a small business owner as they are moved out of Chicago’s most “notorious” and iconic housing project, Cabrini [...]

RESOURCE: AP HuGe Recommended Texts

April 20, 2015 // 0 Comments

The following list is taken from the AP Human Geography Teacher’s Guide. The list looks a little dated, nevertheless, the authors have updated versions of their texts. ———————– Textbooks de Blij, H. J., and Alexander B. Murphy. Human Geography: Culture, Society, and Space. 7th ed. New York: John Wiley, 2003. Fellmann, Jerome D., Arthur Getis, and Judith Getis. Human Geography: Landscapes of Human Activities. 8th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2005. Jordan-Bychkov, Terry G., and Mona Domosh. The Human Mosaic: A Thematic Introduction to Cultural Geography. 9th ed. New York: W. H. Freeman, 2003. Knox, Paul L., and Sallie A. Marston. Places and Regions in Global Context: Human Geography. 3rd ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 2004. Kuby, Michael, John Harner, and Patricia Gober. Human Geography in Action. 3rd ed. New York: John Wiley, 2004. Norton, William. Human Geography. 5th ed. Don Mills, Ont.: Oxford University Press, 2004. [...]

NEWS via psMag: Ironic Gentrification and the Migration of Globalization

March 24, 2014 // 0 Comments

Ironic Gentrification and the Migration of Globalization BY JIM RUSSELL • March 20, 2014 • 2:00 AM Cherry blossom trees in Buffalo, New York, in bloom. (Photo DragonFire1024/Wikimedia Commons) Higher education and health care, two major elements of the new Legacy Economy, are attracting global talent and gentrifying the neighborhoods that surround them, pricing out residents who toil in the local or regional labor market. I link economic globalization to gentrification with migration. Gentrification itself is an indicator of intensifying globalization. The influx of migrants who toil in a global labor market move into a neighborhood and compete with residents who toil in a local or regional labor market. Soon enough, the rent is too damn high. Or, if you like (I do), the wages are too damn low. Both cost for shelter and income impact housing affordability. A conventional measure that captures both variables is percentage of income dedicated to housing. In that light, some [...]

NEWS via TheAtlanticCities.com: America’s 1,000 Richest Neighborhoods

March 23, 2014 // 0 Comments

America’s 1,000 Richest Neighborhoods RICHARD FLORIDA MAR 13, 2014 Carolyn Williams/Flickr America’s “one percent” are a privileged bunch. It takes an adjusted gross income of almost $400,000 to be counted among those who make up the country’s top earners. Together, the top 1 percent account for nearly 20 percent of reported taxable income in the U.S. Overall, the one percent are heavily concentrated along the East and West Coasts. And despite all the talk about gentrification and the movement of the uber-affluent back to the cities, their numbers are overwhelmingly concentrated in the upscale suburbs of America’s increasingly bicoastal economy – places like Greenwich, Connecticut; Bethesda and Potomac, Maryland; Coral Gables, Florida; and Newport Beach, California. Eighteen neighborhoods have average incomes of more than $500,000. These are the location patterns of America’s super rich that geographer Stephen Higley has documented in a new [...]

NEWS via Christian Science Monitor: Why African-Americans are moving back to the South

March 16, 2014 // 0 Comments

After decades of moving north, thousands of blacks are returning to their Southern roots for economic and cultural reasons. By Carmen K. Sisson, Correspondent / March 16, 2014 Artist Kia Darceo left Milwaukee for Atlanta, which she calls ‘Black Mecca.’ This is the cover story in the Mar. 17 issue of The Christian Science MonitorWeekly. Melanie Stetson Freeman/Staff WEST POINT, MISS. When Charlie Cox told his friends he was leaving Chicago, no one tried to talk him out of it. After 35 years at General Motors, he was ready to retire. Ready to trade the cold and the crime and the frenetic pace of life for the rivers and fields of his youth. He had grown up in rural West Point, Miss., and he had moved north with his family when he was 9 years old, but somehow his heart had never quite followed. His spirit yearned for the South, and, as the years passed, the memories of his childhood burned brighter until he couldn’t stand it any longer. There was only one problem: [...]

NEWS via Guardian Liberty Voice: China Population Structure Change Demands Economic Reform

March 15, 2014 // 0 Comments

China Population Structure Change Demands Economic Reform Added by Tina Zhang on March 15, 2014. On March 13, China’s annual parliament meeting closed. Reforms in financialsector, economic structure, environmental protection, and many other areas were proposed. During the nine days of the meeting, there was plenty of news showing disappointing performance in areas such as investment, retail sales and factory output in the first two months of this year. These already invited speculations that policy easing from the government should be imminent. Beijing repeated said it would tolerate slower economic growth in exchange for economic structural transformation. Aside from the often-quoted reasons for such reform, the unstoppable change of the population structure demands China must tough through the pain of slowing economy and its structural reform. China’s working-age population shrank for the first time in 2012 by 3.45 million. Looking into the future, the number of 15 to 24 [...]

NEWS via Newsweek: The Geography of Autism

March 15, 2014 // 0 Comments

The Geography of Autism By Rob Verger Filed: 3/14/14 at 2:56 PM  | Updated: 3/14/14 at 4:09 PM A new study hints at why autism clusters, but experts caution seeking an easy solutionEnrique De La Osa/Reuters Filed Under: Tech & Science, autism, Science, Studie Researchers have long know that autism is found in clusters. Certain communities and states have rates much higher than the rest of the country — a child born in California is several times more likely to be diagnosed with autism than a child in Alabama, for example. But the question why remains unanswered. The geographical nature of the disorder seems to imply some sort of local, environmental cause. And a new study suggests just that: it found a strong correlation between autism rates and male reproductive system malformations, which can be caused by environmental toxins. There is a complex array of factors that can influence autism rates, though: they seem to be affected by issues as diverse as income level, [...]

NEWS via CNN Money: 11 cities where workers are disappearing

March 14, 2014 // 0 Comments

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) Cincinnati, Cleveland and Dayton, Ohio The labor force has been shrinking in all of Ohio’s major cities other than its state capital, Columbus. Cleveland has lost 52,000 workers, or about 5% of its labor force, since November 2007, and Cincinnati lost 39,000 workers, or about 4% of its labor force, since May 2009, according to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data. Job growth is anemic, particularly in Ohio’s main industry, manufacturing. Signs point to workers giving up, said Amy Hanauer, executive director of Policy Matters Ohio. “I think people are getting discouraged and leaving the labor market,” she said. Ohio lost 388,000 jobs in the financial crisis, and has since gained only about a fifth of them back. Phoenix and Tucson, Ariz. The fallout from the housing bust is still felt here. The construction sector slashed more than half its jobs in the crisis, and they’ve only started to trickle back in the last few months. But the [...]

NEWS via HeritageDaily: 17th- and 18th-century risk of disease through Migration

March 5, 2014 // 0 Comments

17th- and 18th-century risk of disease through Migration HERITAGE March 3, 2014 – No comments The fate of migrants moving to cities in 17th- and 18th-century England demonstrates how a single pathogen could dramatically alter the risks associated with migration and migratory patterns today. Cities have always been a magnet to migrants. In 2010, a tipping point was reached for the first time when, according to the World Health Organization, the majority of the world’s population lived in cities. By 2050, seven out of 10 people will have been born in – or migrated to – a city. One hundred years ago, that figure was two out of 10. Today, cities are generally the safest places to live. If you live in one, you’re likely to be richer than someone living in a rural environment. If you’re richer, you’re likely to live longer. If you live in a city, you have better access to hospitals and healthcare, and you’re more likely to be immunised. But that was not always the [...]

RESOURCE via Metropolis Mag: These Maps Show How Subway Maps Twist Urban Reality

February 8, 2014 // 0 Comments

These Maps Show How Subway Maps Twist Urban Reality Komal Sharma A new project by historian Benjamin M. Schmidt reveals how wrong subway maps really are. Courtesy Benjamin M. Schmidt It’s not a secret that our subway maps distort the geographies of the metropoles they claim to represent. When we traverse a city everyday with an MTA (Metropolitan Transportation Authority NY) or WMATA map (Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority), our conception of the city—its boundaries, expanses—easily becomes scrambled. For instance, both Washington’s dense inner core and its spread-out outskirts are all shown on the same scale. In a grid city like Manhattan there might be some semblance of similarity, but in most other cities, reality on the ground is completely different. A new project developed at Northeastern University tackles these problems head on. Benjamin M. Schmidt, a professor of history, has designed interactive digital maps of Boston, New York and Washington that [...]
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