urbanization

VIDEO: Travel in La Paz Bolivia

April 25, 2016 // 0 Comments

This sure beats sitting in rush hour traffic. In La Paz, the sky rail take commuters where they need to go. This is the ultimate example of humans changing their environment out of necessity. Teachers: Use this to compare/contrast LDC vs MDC cities and what it means to have no city planning. Take the discussion further and ask students why this skirl can exist in a developing country but not in the [...]

NEWS via Guardian Liberty Voice: China Population Structure Change Demands Economic Reform

March 15, 2014 // 0 Comments

China Population Structure Change Demands Economic Reform Added by Tina Zhang on March 15, 2014. On March 13, China’s annual parliament meeting closed. Reforms in financialsector, economic structure, environmental protection, and many other areas were proposed. During the nine days of the meeting, there was plenty of news showing disappointing performance in areas such as investment, retail sales and factory output in the first two months of this year. These already invited speculations that policy easing from the government should be imminent. Beijing repeated said it would tolerate slower economic growth in exchange for economic structural transformation. Aside from the often-quoted reasons for such reform, the unstoppable change of the population structure demands China must tough through the pain of slowing economy and its structural reform. China’s working-age population shrank for the first time in 2012 by 3.45 million. Looking into the future, the number of 15 to 24 [...]

NEWS via HeritageDaily: 17th- and 18th-century risk of disease through Migration

March 5, 2014 // 0 Comments

17th- and 18th-century risk of disease through Migration HERITAGE March 3, 2014 – No comments The fate of migrants moving to cities in 17th- and 18th-century England demonstrates how a single pathogen could dramatically alter the risks associated with migration and migratory patterns today. Cities have always been a magnet to migrants. In 2010, a tipping point was reached for the first time when, according to the World Health Organization, the majority of the world’s population lived in cities. By 2050, seven out of 10 people will have been born in – or migrated to – a city. One hundred years ago, that figure was two out of 10. Today, cities are generally the safest places to live. If you live in one, you’re likely to be richer than someone living in a rural environment. If you’re richer, you’re likely to live longer. If you live in a city, you have better access to hospitals and healthcare, and you’re more likely to be immunised. But that was not always the [...]

NEWS via Nat’l Geographic: The Growth of Megacities

February 19, 2014 // 0 Comments

Geography in the News: The Growth of Megacities Posted by Neal Lineback of Geography in the NewsTM on February 17, 2014 By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner,  Geography in the NewsTM Megacities’ Expansive Growth For the first time in human history, more of the world’s 6.8 billion people live in cities than in rural areas. That is an incredible demographic and geographic shift since 1950 when only 30 percent of the world’s 2.5 billion inhabitants lived in urban environments. The world’s largest cities, particularly in developing countries, are growing at phenomenal rates. As a growing landless class is attracted by urban opportunities, meager as they might be, these cities’ populations are ballooning to incredible numbers. A May 2010 Christian Science Monitor article on “megacities” predicted that by 2050, almost 70 percent of the world’s estimated 10 billion people—more than the number of people living today—will reside in urban areas. The social, [...]

NEWS via Mlive.com: ‘I used to live here’: Saginaw’s Steep Population Drop hits Neighborhoods

February 2, 2014 // 0 Comments

Keyterms: Population Geography, urbanization, deindustrialization, out-migration, white-flight, redlining, push factors, Urban Geography, Economic Geography, Development, Blight, Industry, Manufacturing, secondary economic activity. (¯`·._.·(¯`·._.·(¯`·._.· Article Below ·._.·´¯)·._.·´¯)·._.·´¯) ‘I used to live here’: Saginaw’s steep population drop hits neighborhoods By Mark Tower | mtower@mlive.com on January 26, 2014 at 7:00 AM, updated January 26, 2014 at 11:17 AM SAGINAW, MI — Former Saginaw City Manager Darnell Earley often said his job was one of “managing decline.” In just five decades, the city’s population dropped from nearly 100,000 in the 1960s to fewer than 52,000 by the 2010 census. To say it another way, Saginaw lost 48 percent of its residents during the last 50 years. The reasons for the decline are many, and the impact of the outbound migration is still felt today. This week, The Saginaw News takes a look [...]

NEWS vía GlobalPost: Latin America: The Cost of Murder

January 18, 2014 // 0 Comments

The effects that crime, violence, and the homicide rate have on Latin America is a model for the rest of the world. The loss of GDP due to a loss of a work force is starting to have an effect on countries in the form of a lost TAX BASE which can lead to decaying INFRASTRUCTURE and social programs. A increasing adult MORTALITY RATE leaves orphans without families and ultimately guidance for their futures. Coupled with political corruption, there is little hope for the trend to change any time soon. -The Human Imprint  ▇ ▅ █ ▅ ▇ ▂ ▃ ▁ ▁ ▅ ▃ ▅ ▅ ▄ ▅ ▇ ▇ ▅ █ ▅ ▇ ▂ ▃ ▁ ▁ ▅ ▃ ▅ ▅ ▄ ▅ ▇ ▇ ▅ █ ▅ ▇ ▂ ▃ ▁ Latin America: The cost of murder Simeon Tegel, January 18, 2014 06:01 Editor’s note: Warning — this article contains graphic images. LIMA, Peru — Dreams of a better life randomly shattered forever by a stranger’s bullet. Homeless orphans sucked into violent crime. Entire neighborhoods where the [...]
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