world

VIDEO: Where are the World’s Worst Slums?

April 21, 2016 // 0 Comments

This short 2:46 second vide clip presented by TestTube News describes how the United Nations categorizes an urban slum and also where are the most populated urban slums in the world. It is a great introduction to problems within the LDC city and the topic of [...]

RESOURCE: AP HuGe Recommended Texts

April 20, 2015 // 0 Comments

The following list is taken from the AP Human Geography Teacher’s Guide. The list looks a little dated, nevertheless, the authors have updated versions of their texts. ———————– Textbooks de Blij, H. J., and Alexander B. Murphy. Human Geography: Culture, Society, and Space. 7th ed. New York: John Wiley, 2003. Fellmann, Jerome D., Arthur Getis, and Judith Getis. Human Geography: Landscapes of Human Activities. 8th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2005. Jordan-Bychkov, Terry G., and Mona Domosh. The Human Mosaic: A Thematic Introduction to Cultural Geography. 9th ed. New York: W. H. Freeman, 2003. Knox, Paul L., and Sallie A. Marston. Places and Regions in Global Context: Human Geography. 3rd ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 2004. Kuby, Michael, John Harner, and Patricia Gober. Human Geography in Action. 3rd ed. New York: John Wiley, 2004. Norton, William. Human Geography. 5th ed. Don Mills, Ont.: Oxford University Press, 2004. [...]

NEWS: The Country Training People to Leave

March 9, 2015 // 0 Comments

A great article to discuss when teaching BRAINDRAIN. The country training people to leave By Stephen SackurBBC, Philippines The Philippines has one of the fastest growing economies in Asia – but there aren’t enough jobs to go around. So every year the government teaches thousands of people the skills they need to get jobs abroad. When I arrive at the state-run Housemaids Academy in Manila morning exercises are well under way. A squad of uniformed cleaners is poking feather dusters into all corners of the sitting room. In the kitchen trainee cooks are immersed in the finer points of salad preparation. The academy has the feel of a soap-opera set – each room meticulously dressed to ape the reality of a grand residence. Below stairs is a classroom filled with old fashioned school desks. Here, I’m told, the trainee house servants take lessons in hygiene, respect and personal finance. The Philippines government schools tens of thousands of maids, chauffeurs, [...]

VIDEO via FreeBase: Charting Culture by Mapping Migration

August 14, 2014 // 0 Comments

Video: Thousands of Years of Human Migration in Five Minutes By Lisa Raffensperger | July 31, 2014 2:00 pm   It’s enough to put an old-fashioned family tree to shame. A visualization of the migration routes of more than 150,000 people, from 600 BC to the present day, brings to life human history in the Western world in an engrossing and novel way. The model, produced by Maximilian Schich, at the University of Texas at Dallas, along with collaborators from the U.S., Switzerland and Hungary, represents the birth and death dates and locations of individual people. These data came from community database Freebase, a well-known German encyclopedia of the world’s artists, and Getty’s online artist names database. The sample included such notable individuals as David, King of Israel, and Leonardo da Vinci, but, since Freebase is editable by anyone, it also included average folk. “You will have people where we know that there was a carpenter in Nuremberg, who lived from 1530 to [...]

VIDEO RESOURCE: The Most Complex International Borders in the World

August 6, 2014 // 0 Comments

Message from the creator: In this video I look at some of the most complex international border. Of course, there are more complex borders in the world, but this video looks at some of my favourites. I look at the 3 enclaves countries of the world: Vatican City, San Marino and Lesotho. As well as Campione d’Italia, an Italian exclave which is an enclave of Switzerland. I then take things up a notch and look at enclaves within enclaves. The town of Baarle which is in the Netherlands and Belgium is an incredibly complicated border. But not quite as much as the Cooch Behar region of India and Bangladesh. This is followed by a look at the odd situation of Bir Tawil, the only unclaimed land on Earth outside of Antarctica (which is itself a place for complex borders!) I finish off the video by looking at the island of Cyprus, which may look like a borderless island, but is in fact far from [...]

Observations from the 2014 AP Human Geography Reading

June 11, 2014 // 4 Comments

Once again the AP Human Geography reading was a success. I still firmly believe that this group pf 500+ teachers and professors have GOT to be the most extraordinary and interesting people than any other group of readers. The stories that we all overhear while riding up the escalator for lunch are unbelievable and  inspires me to keep pushing to be a better teacher than I was yesterday. Never mind the 1125 free response questions that I graded- this is by far the best professional development that I can ever get. I am very thankful for a productive professional development night, and all of the other “professional development” nights outside of the convention center. After pondering the rubric that we used for grading and discussing it with my table, I decided to do some further research into the previous years and see what types of verbs that the FRQ test requests the students to answer. Some of my findings were interesting and provoked more thought while others were [...]

NEWS via BloombergBusinessWeek: Megadams Are Dismal Investments

March 22, 2014 // 0 Comments

Megadams Are Dismal Investments By Blake Schmidt March 13, 2014 Photograph by Taylor Weidman/Zuma Press Indigenous Munduruku men at the quarry site for Belo Monte It’s hard to overstate the massive proportions of Belo Monte. When completed, it will be the world’s third-largest dam. Set in the heart of the Brazilian Amazon, it will funnel water through 18 turbines, each with the diameter of the Space Shuttle. When the last one is switched on in 2019, Belo Monte will have a capacity of 11,233 megawatts—enough to supply power to 40 percent of Brazil’s households. Construction crews, which began work in 2011, will have to dig up almost twice as much dirt as was removed to build China’s Three Gorges Dam, and truck in enough steel to build 16 Eiffel Towers, according to the dam’s developers. About 26,000 laborers toil in shifts around the clock. Massive is a word that also applies to the hydropower project’s price. Norte Energia, the consortium awarded a 35-year concession [...]

VIDEO via Frontline: India-The Missing Girls

March 21, 2014 // 0 Comments

Frontline Roughtcut Website In 2006, when my wife and I traveled to India to live and work, the one issue that kept grabbing our attention was northern India’s deep cultural preference for sons over daughters. The desire for sons can be so great, that some families, after having a girl or two, will abort female fetuses until they bear a son. The practice is called female feticide or sex selection. In some ways this is a very old tale. Long before medical abortion became available, unwanted girls were killed after birth or not given enough food and medicine to survive. But modern technology has changed that. Ultrasound machines, which make it possible to determine the gender of a fetus, have spread from big city hospitals to small country clinics. Portable machines are taken to remote villages by motorcycle. As a consequence, infanticide has given way to feticide. Despite a law banning sex selective abortion in force for a decade, as many as half a million female fetuses are [...]

NEWS via Mashable: Mapmakers Debate How to Define Crimea

March 21, 2014 // 0 Comments

Mapmakers Debate How to Define Crimea A cartographer at work, circa 1930.IMAGE: VINTAGE IMAGES/HULTON ARCHIVE/GETTY IMAGES BY COLIN DAILEDA1 DAY AGO Much of the world is watching how the high-stakes tug-of-war over Crimea will play out, but few groups of professionals are more invested than cartographers. Cartographers are tasked with mapping the political dimensions of the globe. That means when a piece of land switches ownership between countries, it’s their job to decide whether they want to make that change official. The latest debate for this small but influential club is centered on Crimea, the once-autonomous region of Ukraine that voted on March 16 to become a part of Russia. Russian President Vladimir Putin has signed a treaty to annex the peninsula, and it now must be approved by the Russian parliament. On Wednesday, the Ukrainian governmentannounced it was pulling out its troops. But Western nations including the United States, the U.K., and Germany, have not [...]

NEWS via CNN: Plugging China’s talent pool

March 20, 2014 // 0 Comments

Plugging China’s talent pool By Zarina Banu for CNN March 20, 2014 — Updated 0603 GMT (1403 HKT) Many are leaving China for reasons like education, food and wealth security and air quality. STORY HIGHLIGHTS China sees 8.5 million mainly middle-class living abroad with less than 10% moving in Paper in China calls exodus “the world’s worst brain drain” Hong Kong (CNN) — “Culture is not the main reason why most Chinese people leave. This is a romantic view. Most people leave China because of practical reasons like education, food and wealth security and air quality.” This is the view of Li Chen, who moved to Hong Kong from the mainland two years ago. A combination of pragmatism and aspiration led the 32-year-old Masters of Journalism student to leave. He said when his wife was offered the chance to relocate to Hong Kong, the timing for the couple was just right. The move allowed Li to pursue his passion for photography and will earn him [...]

NEWS via FCW.com: Why Maps Matter

March 20, 2014 // 0 Comments

Why maps matter By Frank Konkel Mar 17, 2014 People used to use maps so they wouldn’t get lost. But in recent years, access to the Global Positioning System and the proliferation of mobile technology have made paper-based maps almost irrelevant. Unless you’re in uncharted territory, it’s hard to get lost anymore. Basic geography is as easy as inputting an address and letting your mobile phone tell you how to get there. And as mapping technology advances, it allows for far more than foolproof directions. Federal agencies now use geospatial data, geo-analytics and multi-layered maps for myriad purposes, including gathering intelligence, predicting disease outbreaks and sharing data pools with the public. The allure of mapping lies in its intuitiveness. Even simple “dots on a map can be a powerful way to see trends in data,” said Josh Campbell, geographic information system architect for the Humanitarian Information Unit at the State Department. “Maps [...]

NEWS via NPR: An Imaginary Town Becomes Real, Then Not. True Story

March 18, 2014 // 0 Comments

by ROBERT KRULWICH March 18, 2014 4:43 PM This is the story of a totally made-up place that suddenly became real — and then, strangely, undid itself and became a fantasy again. Imagine Pinocchio becoming a real boy and then going back to being a puppet. That’s what happened here — but this is a true story. It’s about a place in upstate New York called Agloe. You can see it here, circled in blue …  … just up the road from Roscoe and Rockland. In the 1930s (I learned from Frank Jacobs’ excellent blog, Strange Maps), there was no town on that stretch between Rockland and nearby Beaverkill — just a dirt road. This wasn’t an important or often visited place, which made it a perfect spot for what’s called a “paper town,” or a map “trap.” Pirate-Protected Maps Companies that create maps get their work copied all the time. You hire a draftsman. You check spellings, you work on the colors, you get all the cities in the [...]

NEWS via Christian Science Monitor: Why African-Americans are moving back to the South

March 16, 2014 // 0 Comments

After decades of moving north, thousands of blacks are returning to their Southern roots for economic and cultural reasons. By Carmen K. Sisson, Correspondent / March 16, 2014 Artist Kia Darceo left Milwaukee for Atlanta, which she calls ‘Black Mecca.’ This is the cover story in the Mar. 17 issue of The Christian Science MonitorWeekly. Melanie Stetson Freeman/Staff WEST POINT, MISS. When Charlie Cox told his friends he was leaving Chicago, no one tried to talk him out of it. After 35 years at General Motors, he was ready to retire. Ready to trade the cold and the crime and the frenetic pace of life for the rivers and fields of his youth. He had grown up in rural West Point, Miss., and he had moved north with his family when he was 9 years old, but somehow his heart had never quite followed. His spirit yearned for the South, and, as the years passed, the memories of his childhood burned brighter until he couldn’t stand it any longer. There was only one problem: [...]

NEWS via Guardian Liberty Voice: China Population Structure Change Demands Economic Reform

March 15, 2014 // 0 Comments

China Population Structure Change Demands Economic Reform Added by Tina Zhang on March 15, 2014. On March 13, China’s annual parliament meeting closed. Reforms in financialsector, economic structure, environmental protection, and many other areas were proposed. During the nine days of the meeting, there was plenty of news showing disappointing performance in areas such as investment, retail sales and factory output in the first two months of this year. These already invited speculations that policy easing from the government should be imminent. Beijing repeated said it would tolerate slower economic growth in exchange for economic structural transformation. Aside from the often-quoted reasons for such reform, the unstoppable change of the population structure demands China must tough through the pain of slowing economy and its structural reform. China’s working-age population shrank for the first time in 2012 by 3.45 million. Looking into the future, the number of 15 to 24 [...]

NEWS via Al Jazeera: How the North Ended up on Top of the Map

February 23, 2014 // 0 Comments

How the north ended up on top of the map by Nick Danforth @ajam February 16, 2014 A cartographic history of what’s up McArthur’s Universal Corrective Map of the World.Flickr A world map drawn by the Moroccan cartographer Muhammad al-Idrisi for King Roger of Sicily, 1154. Wikipedia Why do maps always show the north as up? For those who don’t just take it for granted, the common answer is that Europeans made the maps and they wanted to be on top. But there’s really no good reason for the north to claim top-notch cartographic real estate over any other bearing, as an examination of old maps from different places and periods can confirm. The profound arbitrariness of our current cartographic conventions was made evident by McArthur’s Universal Corrective Map of the World, an iconic “upside down” view of the world that recently celebrated its 35th anniversary. Launched by Australian Stuart McArthur on Jan. 26, 1979 (Australia Day, naturally), this map is supposed to [...]
Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On Pinterest